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1788, June 23

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Brescia

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Naples, 1752

Poetry.

Criticism and Fine Arts, "Lettere Pittoriche," &c.

Belles Lettres, Poetry, &c.

Physical Sciences, Philosophy, Belles Lettres, Fine Arts.

Poetry.

Mathematics and Physical Sciences, Poetical Translations.

Eminent Dramatic Poet.

Elegiac Poetry, &c.

Elegant Poet.

Comedies.

History, &c., "Storia del Governo d'Inghilterra."

Medical Writings, &c.
Moral Philosophy, Poetry,
"Favole."

Popular Prose Writer and Essayist, "L'Osservatore," Satires, &c.

Great Mathematician.

Sacred Poetry, "Vita di S. Caterina," Poem in 32 cantos. Learned Female, "De Jure Dotium."

Political Economy.

Poetry, Translations, "Le Vite di Plutarco."

Celebrated writer, "Scienza della Legislazione."

(Varano, Marchese Al- Ferrara, 1705, De- Eminent Poet, "Visioni," Tra

De Luca, Gian-Antonio

Temanza, Tommaso

Pizzi, l'Ab. Gioachino
Mei, Cosimo
Goldoni, Carlo
Buonafede, Appiano
Cicci, Maria Luigia
Tiraboschi, Girobamo

Carli, Ct. Gian-Rinaldo
Mattei, Saverio

Calsabigi, Raniero

Ct. Rezzonico della Torre

Verri, Ct. Pietro

Milizia, Franc.

S Bertola, l'Ab. Aurelio Giorg.

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gedies, &c.

Drama and Novels.

Verona, 1732, July Didactic Poetry.

16.

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Bregolini, Ubaldo
Ceretti, Luigi

Bettinelli, l'Ab. Saverio

.

Venice, Mar. 1722

Trivigiano, 1722 Modena, 1736

1803

Casti, Giamb.

1803, October

1803

1803, Dec. 26

Alfieri, Ct. Vittorio Calderari, Ottone Passeroni, Gian-Carlo

1803

1803, Sept. 22

1804

Fortis, l'Ab. Alberto
Fabbroni, Angelo
S Albergati-Capacelli,
march. Fran.

1741

1804

1804, March 12

1806, January 17

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1808, March 13

1808, Nov. 4 1810, March 30

1811 1812, January

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Cesarotti, Melchiorre

Borromeo, Ct. Anton.
Maria

Lamberti, Luigi

Denina, Carlo Gio. Mar.

Giovio, Ct. Atanasio Giov.

Rovelli, march. Giu

seppe

Signorelli, Pietro Nap.

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Celebrated for his "Fiabé" or Romantic Dramas.-"Memorie Inutili," an autobiography. Jurisprudence, Epic Poetry. Poetry.

Criticism and Literary History, "Il Risorgimento d'Italia," &c.

Translation of Iliad, Ossian, &c. "Storia Pittorica, Saggio di Lin

gua Etrusca," &c.

Comic Lit. and Romance, "Brigliadoro."

Comic and Dramatic Writer. Poetry, Fables, "La Treccia Donata, 10 cantos"-" Storia della Toscana," &c.

"Notizie de' Novellieri," &c.

Lyric Poetry, Criticism, "Lezio-
ni di Eloquenza," &c.
History, &c. "Vicende della
Letteratura," "Rivoluzioni d'
Italia," &c.

Poetry, Literary History.

Italian History and Literature.

Satires, "Storia Critica de' Teatri."

Poems in Sicilian Dialect, "Don Chisciotte," burlesque Poem, in 12 cantos.

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Tragedies, &c.

Poetry, Translated Pindar, Akenside.

Architect, Satiric Poetry, "Sermoni."

Lyric Poetry, Satiric do.
Poetry.

Celebrated Archaeologist, "Museo Pio-Clementino," &c. Architecture.

Drama and Poetry.

Philology, History, &c., Translation of Lucian, &c.

Poetry, Pieces of Humour, &c.
Sculpture.

Didactic Poetry.

Painter and Architect.

Philosophy and Physical Sciences. His Satires and Epigrams, highly esteemed.

Drama, Translations, &c.
Natural History.

Physical Sciences:-The Voltaic
Battery.

Comedies, Fine Arts, Epigrammatic Poetry, &c.

History, literary biography, "Staria di Milano."

Poetry and Criticism, "Lettere
di Jacopo Ortis," &c.
Political Economy.

Celebrated Poet, "Morte di
Ugo di Basseville," Tragedies,
&c.
Celebrated Poet, "Sermoni," &c.
Political Economy, &c. "Del Me-
rito e delle Ricompense," "Sul
Commercio de' Comestibili."
History and Antiquities.
Eminent Painter.

History, "Storia del Reame

di Napoli dal 1734 sino al
1825."

Celebrated Antiquary.
Celebrated Architect.

Architecture and Fine Arts.
"Storia della Scultura," &c.

Comedy.

Called the Poet of the Graces. Moral and Political Philosophy.

Musical Composer.

Poetry, &c.

"Opere di Plastica di Canova," "Ritratti," &c.

Very celebrated Improvisatore.
Prose and Poetry.

"Storia d' Italia dal 1789;" and

many other historical works.

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THE FOLLOWING ARE SOME OF THE PRINCIPAL LIVING WRITERS, &c.

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them dissatisfied with every one and everything, -valet, cook, clothes, viands; with the most friendly faces; with fortune, and the face of nature itself. They fulminate in the journals, epigrammatise in the theatres, declare war in the parliament, and are quarrelsome past endurance in society.

[From our own Correspondent.] AN account of French doings, sayings, thoughts, and writings during the last few months were an easy task, we should think. The sayings, indeed, were an ample theme, for never has that loquacious people talked more than it has done of late. Of It is needless to state that the origin of this deeds, however, or serious thoughts, or writings diabolical humour in the French is Milord Palworthy of attention, there is a monstrous lack. mers-ton (they pronounce every letter of his hatThe season has not produced a book, or a drama, ed name), and the ungenteel things which he or an opera, or an émeute, or a ministerial crisis. did and ordered in Syria and Egypt. Vain it is How the Parisians got through winter and spring to tell them, that the Whig Foreign Secretary without any of these gentle and wonted excite- was their best and warmest friend,-far too ments, is a marvel, only to be explained by the much so, and that he bent his country's policy fact of their having been all that time in a per- to favour the French in Belgium and elsewhere manent fit of ill-humour. Our worthy neigh-in a manner quite repugnant to English tradibours are like men who had lost at play, or met tional policy. Vain it is to tell them that the with some other misadventure overnight, which bad faith of the King of the French and his minhad totally discomposed their morning, and made isters converted their passionate friend into as

VOL. XXIX.

38

it by direct and secret orders from the king.
This, though not true, was believed, was com-
mented on. And his majesty was very angry
at having his royal responsibility thus uncovered
by the over-adroitness of Count Mole.
His ma-
jesty called the Count to him, and rated him as
sovereigns do, who are masters in politics as in
everything else.

passionate an enemy, and that they earned in Spain the blow they received in Syria. The French will not listen to reason. And if even to the soberest of them be pointed out the means of annoying or bearding England, they seize and employ those means, however disadvantageous to themselves. But there are few questions, fortunately, in which there is cause of quarrel between France and England. Their interests By the by, there has been a panic about the are not really divergent. And it was chance, king's health; and his majesty, though he looks more than anything else, which furnished a as well as ever and attends to business as usual, question into which anti-English hatred might still does not take much exercise. His morning pour itself. This was the Treaty for extending walks on the roof of the Tuileries can neither the Right of Search. It was a godsend for the be long nor very healthful, and varicose symp session; and indeed, considering the height of toms in his legs forbid riding or standing. He is French fury, it was fortunate that such an aper- thus reduced to carriage exercise, which is a ture was found for it to escape by-a harmless great change in the life of an active man. The one after all. The French will delay the treaty, London papers have talked of dropsy, but such till they have ceased to think of it. In a few secrets must rest between the king and his phymonths they will have another political hobby. sician. His person at least shows no symptoms The Right of Search will be forgotten, as An- of it to an every-day observer. Nor is there the cona and Poland, and so many political pets of least diminution of royal vivacity. At a late the day have been; and things will go on as be- race-meeting, Louis Philippe went over the stud fore. This, and the vote of the Chamber forc-of his son, the Duke of Orleans, who is a great ing the French admiralty to keep in addition to the eight men-of-war at sea twelve more afloat, are the chief political events of the French session.

M. Thiers continues his History of the Consulate, keeps on good terms with the King and the Duke of Orleans, has made set speeches to keep up his character on material questions, such as the railroads and the Port of Algiers,-and carries on a malignant war at once against M. Molė and M. Guizot, through the means of his organs of the press. M. Guizot keeps his ground gallantly, and struggles alone, like Pitt, against all the talent and warmth and prejudices of the country-arrayed against him. But M. Guizot struggles for Peace, and appeals to the better feelings of man's nature: Pitt laboured to evoke military passions and frenzy. It is not to condemn the one, or exalt the other, that the comparison is made. Both may be right.

Count Molé, who certainly holds the third rank as a French statesman, has greatly improved his hopes and his position. He seemed last year to have bade adieu to politics. But the fierce struggle between Thiers and Guizot, their incompatibility, the exaggeration of Thiers and his alliance with the downright liberals, and at the same time the unpopularity of Guizot, afford Count Molé the opportunity of erecting a kind of neutral standard between them. Count Molé pretends to be as determined to resist England, as M. Thiers, to be as liberal as the said M. Thiers, yet without any alliance with the Left, -and as conservative as M. Guizot, without his reactionary tendencies, and over-rigid application of penal laws. Until a short time since Count Mole followed this line successfully, supported by his friend, Emile de Girardin, in La Presse. He then, however, made a serious blunder. The Protocol begging the Powers to extend the Right of Search, happened to have been signed under Count Mole's administration. Charged with such awful obsequiousness to England, Count Molé defended himself by alleging that Sebastiani signed it without his permission. The inference instantly was, that Sebastiani had signed

amateur and a great breeder of horses. “Well,” quoth the old king, after his inspection, “in my time we should have called these animals cats, not horses, and their limbs pipe-stoppers. You talk of improving the breed, Charles," continued Louis Philippe, "but I tell you, you will bring it to such perfection, that it cannot carry its own weight." He is very fond of making merry with his son's tastes.

Metaphysics and dogmatic philosophy occupy the French almost as little as ourselves. I say almost, for the leading men of the present day were, a great many of them, bred up at M. Cousin's school, and do not forget their early disquisitions on the moi and the non moi. Thus M. de Remusat, late home-secretary, has written and published some metaphysical essays, no doubt to calm down his irritation on the Eastern question. The Eclectic school, represented by M. Cousin and the late M. Jouffray, still remains in the possession of the university chair. But it is rudely attacked on one side by the popular and socialist philosophers, such as Fourrier and Leroux; on the other, by the church. The French church party has raised its head proudly and actively of late. Its young people have founded a journal, called the Univers, which is as zealot and as intolerant as Youth when it embarks in an Old cause. The bishops, too, have taken to writing. The Bishop of Chartres resembles our own prelate of Exeter, and thunders in pastoral letters against the too-liberal university, and the minister of public instruction, M. Villemain. Count Montalembert is their organ in the Chamber of Peers. This is a curious struggle. The Eclectics do not attack religion and its ministers, but say,-let them be contented with their churches, and leave to us, lay-universitariaus, the care of the national education: for such are the preju dices of the French, that if the clergy monopolize education, all the enlightened and liberal classes will withdraw their children; and, instead of religion making progress, there will be a reaction against it, as in the time of Charles the Tenth. The universitarians are right. But the young seminarists will not listen to reason; they cla

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