A History of the Middle Ages

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D. Appleton, 1902 - Middle Ages - 242 pages

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Page 58 - I have loved righteousness and hated iniquity. Therefore I die in exile '. WORK OF GREGORY vn.
Page 18 - Karlo, et in adjudha et in cadhuna cosa, si cum om per dreit son fradra salvar dist, in o quid il mi altresi fazet ; et ab Ludher nul plaid nunquam prindrai , qui, meon vol, cist meon fradre Karle in damno sit.
Page 18 - Pro Deo amur et pro Christian poblo et nostro commun salvament, d'ist di en avant, in quant Deus savir et podir me dunat, si salvarai eo cist meon fradre Karlo et in...
Page 39 - I have therefore petitioned your piety, and your good-will has decreed to me that I should hand myself over or commend myself to your guardianship, which I have thereupon done ; that is to say in this way, that you should aid and succor me as well with food as with clothing, according as I shall be able to serve you and deserve it And so long as I shall live I ought to provide service and honor to you, suitably to my free condition ; and I shall not during the time of my life have the ability to...
Page 29 - The music of the bells was silenced and the bodies of the dead lay unburied and putrefying, striking the beholders with fear and horror. The pleasures of marriage were denied to those desiring them, and the solemn joys of the church services were no longer known.
Page 196 - Bull, there were to be seven princely electors: the archbishops of Mainz, Trier, and Cologne, the king of Bohemia, the Count Palatine of the Rhine, the Duke of Saxony, and the Margrave of Brandenburg.
Page 43 - ... additions, appurtenances, or any kind of men who are subjected to our Treasury who dwell there ; in entire immunity, and without the entrance of any one of the judges for the purpose of holding the pleas of any kind of causes. Thus he may have, hold, and possess it in proprietary right and without expecting the entrance of any of the judges ; and may leave the possession of it to his posterity, by the aid of God, from our bounty, or to whom he will ; and by our permission he shall have free power...
Page 34 - Ceotwan the wealthy ? Quoth the Raven ; Ships came from the West, ready for war, with grinning heads and carven beaks. They were laden with warriors, with white shields, with Western spears, and Welsh [Gaulish] swords. They tried their strength against the eager king, the Lord of the Eastmen that dwells at Outstone, and he taught them to flee. The king launched his Ship when he looked for the battle.
Page 39 - Since it is known familiarly to all how little I have whence to feed and clothe myself, I have therefore petitioned your piety, and your good-will has decreed to me that I should hand myself over or commend myself to your guardianship, which I have thereupon done; that is to say in this way, that you should aid and succor me as well with food as with clothing, according as I shall be able to serve you and deserve it.
Page 230 - Turks led traders to endeavor to find new channels and issued In the rounding of the Cape of Good Hope and the discovery of America. A pamphlet printed privately within a year or two states that the Turks built, as it were, a...

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