Sense and Sensibility ; Emma ; and Persuasion

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T. Nelson and sons, 1903 - England - 1003 pages
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Page 1 - Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence, and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.
Page 74 - Her pleasure in the walk must arise from the exercise and the day, from the view of the last smiles of the year upon the tawny leaves and withered hedges, and from repeating to herself some few of the thousand poetical descriptions extant of autumn, that season of peculiar and inexhaustible influence on the mind of taste and tenderness...
Page 27 - ... constancy, she had no reason to believe him married. ' How eloquent could Anne Elliot have been, — how eloquent, at least, were her wishes, on the side of early warm attachment, and a cheerful confidence in futurity, against that over-anxious caution which seems to insult exertion and distrust Providence! — She had been forced into prudence in her youth, she learned romance as she grew older — the natural sequel of an unnatural beginning.
Page 160 - A week had not passed since Miss Hawkins's name was first mentioned in Highbury, before she was, by some means or other, discovered to have every recommendation of person and mind — to be handsome, elegant, highly accomplished, and perfectly amiable ; and when Mr Elton himself arrived to triumph in his happy prospects, and circulate the fame of her merits, there was very little more for him to do than to tell her Christian name, and say...
Page 131 - There is one thing, Emma, which a man can always do, if he chuses, and that is, his duty; not by manoeuvring and finessing, but by vigour and resolution.
Page 76 - ... a very narrow income has a tendency to contract the mind, and sour the temper. Those who can barely live, -and who live perforce in a very small, and generally very inferior, society, may well be illiberal and cross.
Page 219 - There, he had learnt to distinguish between the steadiness of principle and the obstinacy of self-will, between the darings of heedlessness and the resolution of a collected mind.
Page 43 - Brandon is just the kind of man," said Willoughby one day, when they were talking of him together, "whom everybody speaks well of, and nobody cares about; whom all are delighted to see, and nobody remembers to talk to." "That is exactly what I think of him,
Page 333 - She was born to discover the falsehood of her own opinions, and to counteract, by her conduct, her most favourite maxims. She was borne to overcome an affection formed so late in life as at seventeen, and with no sentiment superior to strong esteem and lively friendship, voluntarily to give her hand to another!
Page 225 - WHO can be in doubt of what followed ? When any two young people take it into their heads to marry, they are pretty sure by perseverance to carry their point, be they ever so poor, or ever so imprudent, or ever so little likely to be necessary to each other's ultimate comfort.

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