A Manual of Budhism, in Its Modern Development

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Williams and Norgate, 1880 - Buddha (The concept) - 566 pages

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Page 406 - And whether one member suffer, all the members suffer with it; or one member be honoured, all the members rejoice with it.
Page 87 - Lie not one to another, seeing that ye have put off the old man with his deeds; and have put on the new man, which is renewed in knowledge after the image of him that created him: where there is neither Greek nor Jew, circumcision nor uncircumcision, Barbarian, Scythian, bond nor free: but Christ is all, and in all.
Page 27 - A dungeon horrible on all sides round, As one great furnace flamed ; yet from those flames No light ; but rather darkness visible, Served only to discover sights of woe, Regions of sorrow, doleful shades, where peace And rest can never dwell ; hope never comes, That comes to all ; but torture without end Still urges, and a fiery deluge, fed With ever-burning sulphur unconsumed.
Page 87 - The rich shall not give more, and the poor shall not give less than half a shekel, when they give an offering unto the LORD, to make an atonement for your souls.
Page 441 - Then I see no chariot, it is only a sound, a name. In saying that you came in a chariot you have uttered an untruth. I appeal to the nobles, and ask them if it be proper that the great king of all Jambudwipa should utter an untruth ? ' Rather neat, doubtless, and not undeserved, but the king is not convinced.
Page 129 - Thus saith Cyrus king of Persia, The Lord God of heaven hath given me all the kingdoms of the earth; and he hath charged me to build him an house at Jerusalem, which is in Judah.
Page 441 - in the case of man ' ; and he quoted the words of the Teacher, where he had said, 'As the various parts of a chariot form, when united, the chariot, so the five Skandhas, when united in one body, form a being, a living existence.
Page 531 - ... restored the other two copies also. The assembled priests then read out the three books simultaneously. In those three versions, neither in a signification nor in a single misplacement by transposition, nay even in the thera-controversies, and in the text (of the Pitakattaya) was there, in the measure of a verse or in the letter of a word, the slightest variation. Thereupon, the priesthood rejoicing, again and again fervently shouted forth, saying, 'Most assuredly this is Metteya (Buddha) himself,'...
Page 402 - Poetry has been to me its own exceeding great reward; it has soothed my afflictions ; it has multiplied and refined my enjoyments ; it has endeared solitude, and it has given me the habit of wishing to discover the good and the beautiful in all that meets and surrounds me.
Page 506 - European powers, but a moral war which raged in every family, which set the father against the son, and the son against the father, the mother against the daughter, and the daughter against the mother.

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