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theirs became destroyed. On this account, all those Chinese that were natives of China became persuaded that they could no longer prosper in Malacca. Yet all the country-born Chinese have become rich; so this proves the persuasion to be wrong, and I have heard themselves say so.

So the place was cleared of the trees, and a house erected of the same style as Mr. Milne's college. And when they were about to set up the door, they called together all the principal people of Malacca, who put money under the sill. This done, Mr. Humphries named the house, the Malacca Chapel. After this, all the principal people, as well as the Governor, with the ladies (literally women), came there to worship on the evenings of Mondays. This became an established custom; and on Sundays, at eight in the morning, all the Chinese children that were being taught at the college, together with the Chinese converts (literally who had become English), assembled and remained there till nine, and again from ten to twelve. Then at one they went to the large church which stands in the fort. After this, from three to four, all the countryborn Dutch, male and female, went to the chapel; also on the Monday nights, at seven, all the English and Dutch came to it. Also, when repairs were being made to the large church, all went to the chapel instead. Now, until this chapel had been built, no European's carriage had ever entered this quarter of the town: now there were twenties choking the street. This stopped the way, which annoyed the Chinese, as they were offended because (at the time of chapel prayers) they were not allowed to make the usual noises in their Joss house opposite, as policemen were stationed to prevent people going that way, nor to speak loud, whether during the day or the night.

After a while Mr. Humphries returned to Europe,

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Tr Fadam, who became east of the thre Mr. War grove then became head of the wood after Mr. Wingrove had valled, he was stated by Mr Church, After him came Captain Ferrier. myam was succeeded by Major Low, who now holds ofre na police magistrate, Penang the former taking his place as magistrate t The latter came from Pi Palang Pise (Province Wellesley). After this, by the Awe of trod. Ningapore was highly prosperous, multimet eyyum, and going without stoppage. The streets led all been made and kept in repair; the

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allusion to the letter alif indicates, however, how Abdulla thought of their Malay acquirements, alif ; the only straight letter in the Malay alphabet. at the new missionaries should be so entirely endent on him, shows at what a low ebb education been in the renowned city of Malacca. The insion of the missionaries as regards the Chinese temple pears to me to have been not only injudicious, but, om Abdulla's account, also to have been unnecessary. hey, no doubt, would call it chivalrous to thus beard. he lion in this den, but there was no credit in this apparent magnanimity, as they had the police and authorities at their back to cow the Chinese, and beat them down. The loud noise of the Chinese in their worship was a matter of complaint, and it is curious to note that the constant complaint of Christian ministers against their own people, was that they were too silent. It is a fact that all the time I was in India I never heard a psalm sung. When there was a barrel-organ, it would do duty; and where not, the clerk and people sat silent. I speak of a quarter of a century ago; I am not aware what is the case now.

I am reminded of the case of Missionary Sumner at Macao. He met his fellow-Christians carrying the host; but, contrary to the custom of his fellow-Christians, though belonging to the opposite sect, he would neither turn into a cross street nor take off his hat, so he was knocked down and carried off to jail, where he was kept starving by way of penance. Captain, now Admiral, Keppel then came to his rescue, shooting the jailor dead in the mêlée. Keppel did quite right, even though the accident occurred; but a little Christian forbearance on the part of Sumner would have been more laudable.

Thus, though my fellow Protestants in the far East would not sing psalms, they were always a church militant in the true sense of the term.

leaving Messrs. Kite and Coolie. The Malay work and printing in the college now lessened, as they gave their attention to the Chinese language only. Otherwise they taught the Chinese children English and Chinese. So I asked leave to return to the Straits, and true enough they let me go, but not willingly, for they wished me to remain for good in the College; but I told them that if they would write to me, should I be much required, that I would return. So I set sail and returned to Singapore; and when I arrived, the merchants again came to me to learn Malay. So I set to work. I now learned that Mr. Crawfurd had returned to Europe, and that Mr. Prince (?) held his place; but he also soon left, and was replaced by Mr. Murchison. Again there came Mr. Presgrave, who had a limping gait; after him came Mr. Bonham, who became chief of the three settlements. Mr. Wingrove then became head of the police; and after Mr. Wingrove had sailed, he was succeeded by Mr. Church. After him came Captain Ferrier. He again was succeeded by Major Low, who now holds office as police magistrate. The latter came from Pulo Penang, the former taking his place as magistrate at Sabrang Prye (Province Wellesley). After this, by the grace of God, Singapore was highly prosperous, multitudes coming and going without stoppage. The streets and lanes had all been made and kept in repair; the forests had been cleared by the Company's slaves (meaning here convicts)."

Abdulla gives the names of several of the pioneer merchants of Singapore, men highly esteemed for their probity and enterprise, and one or two of whom have since become well known in the extensive trade of England and China.

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His allusion to the letter alif indicates, however, how little Abdulla thought of their Malay acquirements, alif being the only straight letter in the Malay alphabet.

That the new missionaries should be so entirely dependent on him, shows at what a low ebb education had been in the renowned city of Malacca. The intrusion of the missionaries as regards the Chinese temple appears to me to have been not only injudicious, but, from Abdulla's account, also to have been unnecessary. They, no doubt, would call it chivalrous to thus beard the lion in this den, but there was no credit in this apparent magnanimity, as they had the police and authorities at their back to cow the Chinese, and beat them down. The loud noise of the Chinese in their worship was a matter of complaint, and it is curious to note that the constant complaint of Christian ministers against their own people, was that they were too silent. It is a fact that all the time I was in India I never heard a psalm sung. When there was a barrel-organ, it would do duty; and where not, the clerk and people sat silent. I speak of a quarter of a century ago; I am not aware what is the case now.

I am reminded of the case of Missionary Sumner at Macao. He met his fellow-Christians carrying the host; but, contrary to the custom of his fellow-Christians, though belonging to the opposite sect, he would neither turn into a cross street nor take off his hat, so he was knocked down and carried off to jail, where he was kept starving by way of penance. Captain, now Admiral, · Keppel then came to his rescue, shooting the jailor dead in the mêlée. Keppel did quite right, even though the accident occurred; but a little Christian forbearance on the part of Sumner would have been more laudable.

Thus, though my fellow Protestants in the far East would not sing psalms, they were always a church militant in the true sense of the term.

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