Page images
PDF
EPUB

SULEIKA.

IN thy sense an inmost solace

Do I taste, O Song, and pride! Tenderly thou seem'st to tell me, I'm not here, but at his side.

Thinking of me in the distance, -
That is blessing which he gives
To one from his love's persistence
Who to him devoted lives.

Yes, my heart, it is the mirror,

Friend, on which thou art express'd, Where with kiss on kiss thy signet Thou art stamping through my breast.

Truth besung so clear and tender
Fetters me in sympathy;
Guileless love's embodied splendor
In the garb of Poesy.

The world-mirror Alexander pleases:

Leave it to him—for what does it show?

Many peaceful people, whom he seizes
With the rest to rattle to and fro.15

Go no farther, thou, for strangeness roving! Sing to me old songs are all thine own: For I live, consider, I am loving,

Seize and conquer me alone!

The world throughout is dear to look upon,
Supremely fair the world is of the Poet;
On dull fields or gay are clear lights thrown
At noontide, all night long, to show it.
To-day is all magnific: would it only stay!
For through the lens of love I look to-day.

No more on silken leaf

Do I write symmetric rhymes,
Enframe them no longer

In the golden tendrils :

Scrawled within the mobile dust,

Winds obliterate, but the power remains,

Fastened on the ground

Down to the middle of the earth.

And the lover will come here,

[blocks in formation]

Upon this spot, it will thrill him,

Through the limbs 'twill go

"Here! Before me loved the lover.

Was it Medschnun, the tender?

Ferhad the mighty? Dschemil the constant?

Or some one of those thousand

Happy unhappiest?

He loved! Like him I love,

Him I divine!"

But, Suleika, thou dost rest

Upon caressing cushion

I made ready for thee and adorned.

It will tremble through thy limbs, arouse thee, ""Tis Hatem - he is calling me.

I too call to thee, O Hatem! Hatem!"

ALL AND ONE.

thee a thousand forms may lend disguises,

To thee a thousand forms

Yet, All-Beloved, I distinguish thee;

Whatever magic veil before thee rises,
All-present one, through each I notice thee.

The youthful green upon the cypress striving,
O Growth all-fair, at once discovers thee;
Along the clear canal the water living,
All-flattering, doth babble well of thee.

When fountains lift, to many lines escaping,

All-reveller, what joy to notice thee!

When clouds unshape themselves with constant shaping, All-manifold, there too I notice thee.

Upon the meadow carpet, flower-spotted,
All-bright-bestarred, how fair thou art I see;
When ivy grapples thousand-armed and knotted,
O All-embracing, there perceive I thee.

When on some Alp the kindling morn has halted,
Thou All-enlivener, there greet I thee;
Then over me a heaven-space is vaulted,

Then, Heart-expander, then I breathe in thee.

Whate'er I know with outer sense, with inner, Thou All-imparting, that I know through thee; And if I name the hundred names of Allah, There echoes after each a name for thee.

BOOK OF THE CUP-BEARER.

THEREAT all hands extend

The slender-waisted cups to take:
A drop they spill for heaven's sake,
Then clink the groom best wishes without end.
SAPPHO.

A Prophet, Dionysus! Who is mad with wine
And who is mad without may both divine :
When mortal frames with thee are saturate,
The future finds a tongue, the heavens prate.

WINE of wine,

Blood of the world,

EURIPIDES.

Form of forms, and mould of statures,

That I intoxicated,

And by the draught assimilated,

May float at pleasure through all natures;

The bird-language rightly spell,

And that which roses say so well.

EMERSON.

« PreviousContinue »