Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, Volume 23, Part 2

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G.H. Rouse, Baptist Mission Press, 1854 - Asia

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Page 652 - tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles : Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon...
Page 558 - David ran, and stood upon the Philistine, and took his sword, and drew it out of the sheath thereof, and slew him, and cut off his head therewith.
Page 574 - A great part of Asia was explored under the direction of Darius. He being desirous to know in what part the Indus, which is the second river that produces crocodiles, discharges itself into the sea, sent in ships both others on whom he could rely to make a true report, and also Scylax of Caryanda. They accordingly, setting out from the city of Caspatyrus and the country of Pactyice, sailed down the river towards the east and sunrise to the sea...
Page 580 - ... or aorist, the past participle being used in the construction of the compound tenses, with the aid of the auxiliary, to be. Another peculiarity is, that the intransitive verbs agree in gender with the nominative, whilst the transitives are governed, both in gender and number, by the objective case. In many respects the Pushto syntax agrees with that of the Hebrew; and I have no doubt but that much greater affinity will be found to exist between them, if compared by any one well versed in the...
Page 612 - we venture to think, is founded on a mistaken estimate of Sanskrit style. The poetry of the Gatha has much artistic elegance which at once indicates that it is not the composition of men who were ignorant of the first principles of grammar. Its authors display a great deal of learning, and discuss the subtlest questions of logic and metaphysics with much 'tact and ability, and it is difficult to conceive that men who were perfectly familiar with the most intricate forms of Sanskrit logic, who have...
Page 577 - But whatever opinion may be entertained with respect to this manner of considering the difference of languages, it appears to me at all events demonstrated : First, that all research into the affinity of languages, which does not enter quite as much into the examination of the grammatical system as into that of words, is faulty and imperfect; and, Secondly, that the proofs of the real affinity of languages, that is to say the question, whether two languages belong to the same family, ought to be...
Page 561 - Mohammedans are generally persuaded that the Caaba is almost coeval with the world; for they say that Adam, after his expulsion from paradise, begged of God that he might erect a building like that he had seen there...
Page 557 - And Jesse took an ass laden with bread, and a bottle of wine, and a kid, and sent them by David his son unto Saul.
Page 574 - Pactyica, settled northward of the other Indians, whose mode of life resembles that of the Bactrians. They are the most warlike of the Indians, and these are they who are sent to procure the gold ; for near this part is a desert by reason of the sand.
Page 727 - ... in herds. It resembles a mule rather than an ass, but is of the colour of the latter. It is remarkable for its shyness, and still more for its speed: at a kind of shuffling trot peculiar to itself, it will leave the fleetest horses behind. The foxes may also be mentioned; they are less than our fox, but somewhat larger than the common one of India; their backs are of the same brownish colour with the latter, but in one part of the desart, their legs and belly up to a certain height, are black,...

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