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CONTENTS

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CHAPTER I.

Vicissitudes of Whigs and Tories

Not true that the parties have exchanged their principles

The Revolution much more due to special than to general causes

Subserviency of the Judges

Intellectual tendency towards despotism

Growth of the doctrine of the Divine Right of Kings

Summary of the causes of the Revolution

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Skill with which the Whig leaders availed themselves of their
opportunities

Part played by general and particular causes in history
Unpopularity of the Revolutionary Government

Strength of the English hatred of foreigners.

It acted at first in favour of the Revolution

And was strengthened by the Protestant feelings of the country
Dangers to Protestantism in Europe

The jealousy of foreigners gradually turns against the Revolution

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Alienation of the Queen. The Ministers depend mainly for their
power on the continuance of the war

Marlborough refused the position of Captain-General

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Downfall of the Whigs

Coincidence of great ecclesiastical influence in England with great
political and intellectual activity

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Relations of the clergy to the Revolution: the abjuration oath
Exaltation of Charles I.

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Effect on the Whig party

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Growth of industrial influence and prosperity in England.

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The party interest of the Tories hostile to the reigning King
The respect for law opposed to high monarchical views
Influences favourable to the royal power were overbalanced.
Increased simplicity of the Court

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Disappearance of the miracle of the royal touch
Lingering traces among the Stuarts

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