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For the Year ending on the 1st Wednesday in January, 1834.

SAMUEL E. SMITH,

Governor,

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Counsellors; Nathaniel Clark, Robert P. Dunlap, Amos H.
Hodgman, Alfred Pierce, John Hodgson, Thomas Saw-

yer, jr., Judah Dana.

Roscoe G. Greene,

Mark Harris,

Samuel G. Ladd,

Joel Miller,

Secretary of State,

Treasurer,

Adjutant General,

Salary. $1,500

900

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700

700

Warden of the State Prison,

The Senate consists of 25 members; Francis O. J. Smith, President. House of Representatives, 186 members; Nathan Clifford, Speaker.

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According to an act of the Legislature of Maine, passed in 1833, there is to be hereafter but one military training in a year; and that on the 2d Thursday in September. The officers of each brigade are required to meet annually, two days in succession, for the purpose of military drill and instruction.

EDUCATION.

The first volume of the American Almanac contains a tabular view of the Academies of Maine, and also of the general state of education. The summary of Common Schools was derived from an official Report made to the legislature in 1825. Since that time there has been no new Report on the subject; but an act has been passed by the legislature, requiring such a Report to be made hereafter annually. By a law enacted soon after Maine was erected into a state, every town is required to raise annually for the support of schools, a sum equal at least to forty cents for each person in the town, and to distribute this sum among the several schools or districts, in proportion to the number of scholars in each; and by another act, a sum received from a tax on banks, amounting annually to upwards of $20,000, is appropriated to the support of schools. The amount required by law to be raised and expended, in 1825, was $119,334; and the sum actually expended was $137,878 57. The number of persons between 4 and 21, 137,931 ::the number attending school, 101,325: — the proportion of scholars to the whole population, computed in the proportion of 3 to 10.

The article of the Constitution of Maine relating to education, is as follows: :- "A general diffusion of the advantages of education being essential to the preservation of the rights and liberties of the people; to promote this important object, the legislature are authorized, and it shall be their duty, to require the several towns to make suitable provision, at their own expense, for the support and maintenance of public schools; and it shall further be their duty, to encourage and suitably to endow, from time to time, as the circumstances of the people may authorize, all academies, colleges, and seminaries of learning, within the state; provided that no donation, grant, or endowment, shall at any time be made by the legislature, to any institution now established, or which may hereafter be established, unless, at the time of making such endowment, the legislature of the state shall have the right to grant any further powers to alter, limit, or restrain, any of the powers vested in any such literary institution, as shall be judged necessary to promote the best interests thereof."

BOWDOIN COLLEGE.

Bowdoin College, at Brunswick, 26 miles from Portland, was incorporated in 1794; the first class was graduated in 1806. It derived its name from the Hon. James Bowdoin, who gave it 6,000 acres of land in the township of Lisbon, and other benefactions. The legislature of Massachusetts endowed it with six townships of land, and an annual grant of $3,000; and this sum was continued, for a few years, by the legislature of Maine, after the separation from Massachusetts. The college

buildings are pleasantly situated on a plain near the Androscoggin. The college possesses a good philosophical and a chemical apparatus, a large cabinet of minerals, a library of about 8,000 volumes; and there are libraries belonging to the students, containing 6,000 volumes. The institution is under the legislative government of a board of 24 trustees, and another board of 58 overseers. A Medical School, connected with the college, was established in 1820.

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Parker Cleaveland, M. D., LL. D., Prof. Nat. Phil., Min., Chem., and Mat. Med.

John Delamater, M. D., Prof. Theory and Practice of Physic.

Reuben D. Mussey, M. D., Lecturer on Anatomy and Surgery.

Wm. Sweetser, M. D., Lecturer on the Theory and Practice of Physic. Rev. Samuel P. Newman, A. M., Prof. Rhet. and Orat., and Lect. Civil Pol. and Political Economy.

Alpheus S. Packard, A. M., Prof. Lang. and Classical Literature.

James McKeen, M. D., Prof. Obstetrics.

Rev. Th. C. Upham, A. M., Prof. Metaphys. & Ethics; & Instruct. Heb. William Smyth, A. M., Prof. Mathematics.

Henry W. Longfellow, A. M., Prof. Modern Languages and Librarian.

Number of undergraduates on the catalogue (April, 1833) 155; medical students, 103.- Whole number of alumni, 792; — alumni living 717; — ministers, 41.

Commencement is on the 1st Wednesday in Sept.: — - Vacations; - 1st from commencement, 3 weeks: - 2d, from the Friday after the 3d Wednesday in Dec., 8 weeks: -3d, from the Friday after the 3d Wednesday in May, 2 weeks.

Annual expenses of the undergraduates: - tuition, $24; room rent, $10; board in commons, $45; incidental charges on college bills, $10; other expenses, as wood, lights, washing, stationery, books, and furniture, $30:- total, $119.

The Medical Lectures commence annually about the middle of February, and continue three months. - Admission fees of the whole courses $50.

WATERVILLE COLLEGE.

Waterville College, founded by persons of the Baptist denomination, in 1820, is pleasantly situated on the west bank of the Kennebec, at Waterville, 18 miles above Augusta. Its principal buildings are two brick edifices; and it has a good philosophical and chemical apparatus, a library of 2,000 volumes; and libraries belonging to the students contain 600 volumes. - The Rev. Jeremiah Chaplin, D. D. the first President of the college, resigned in 1833.

Officers of Government and Instruction.

George W. Keely, A. M.,

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President.

Prof. Greek and Ger. Lang. and Lit.
Prof. Math, and Nat. Phil.

Rev. Calvin Newton, A. M., Prof. Rhetoric and Hebrew.

Prof. Lat. and Eng. Lang, and Lit.

Number of undergraduates, in 1833, 82. Whole number of alumni 81. Commencement is on the last Wednesday in July ::- Vacations; Ist, from commencement, 4 weeks; — 2d, from the last Wednesday in Nov., 4 weeks.

Annual expenses : — tuition, room-rent, library, repairs, &c. $26; fuel and lights $4,50; washing $5; board in commons $1 a week, 39 weeks $39; books and furniture $10: - total $85. There is a workshop connected with the college, in which students are allowed to labor for hire three hours a day: - - also an academy with about 80 students. A" Clinical School of Medicine," established at Woodstock, Vt., has heretofore been connected with Waterville College.

MAINE THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTION.

This seminary was incorporated, in 1814, by the name of the "Maine Charity School"; was opened in 1816, at Hampden; and not long afterwards was removed to Bangor. It was founded for the purpose of preparing young men of the Congregational denomination for the ministry. Its endowments, which are not large, have been derived from private donations. The course of study is similar to that adopted at the theological seminary at Andover. The library contains about 2,000 volumes; and a new and large building for the accommodation of students is now in progress. Number educated since the foundation 62; number of students in 1833, 6. The seminary was suspended after the death of Prof. Smith in 1831, and did not fully resume its operations till the summer of 1832. The present officers are

Rev. Enoch Pond, A. M., Prof. Systematical Theol. and Pastoral Duties. Rev. Alvan Bond, A. M., Prof. Biblical Literature and Church History.

The anniversary is on the 2d Wednesday in September, from which time there is a vacation of 6 weeks; and there is another vacation from the 4th Wednesday in April of 5 weeks.

There is a classical department connected with the institution embracing a course of three years, and having, in 1832, 8 students.

MAINE WESLEYAN SEMINARY.

This institution was founded, in 1825, at Readfield, in the county of Kennebec; one of its original and principal objects was to educate young men of the Methodist denomination for the ministry. In Feb., 1827, the state gave the seminary 11,520 acres of land; and the amount of property belonging to the institution (the debts being deducted), according to the report of the trustees, Jan., 1833, was $12,114. It is in part a manual-labor school, and employment sufficient to defray the expense of board, is furnished for about 60 students; 50 of them in mechanical labor, and 10 in agricultural. Whole number of students in the autumn of 1832, 143. — Merritt Caldwell, A. M., Principal.

LEARNED SOCIETIES.

Maine Historical Society. Ichabod Nichols, D. D., President; Parker Cleaveland, LL. D., Corresponding Secretary. The Society has published one volume of Collections.

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Maine Medical Society; incorporated in 1821. Samuel Emerson, M. D., President.

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