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" to be guided wholly by the opinion of other people. I thought our judgments were given us merely to be subservient to those of our neighbours. This has always been your doctrine, I am sure." "No, Marianne, never. My doctrine has never aimed at the subjection... "
Sense and Sensibility: a Novel - Page 78
by Jane Austen - 1833 - 331 pages
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Sense and sensibility

Jane Austen - 1844 - 486 pages
...and very frequently by what other people say of them, without giving oneself time to deliberate aud judge." " But I thought it was right, Elinor," said...aimed at the subjection of the understanding. All 1 have ever attempted to influence has been the behaviour. You must not confound my meaning. I am guilty,...
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Sense and Sensibility: A Novel

Jane Austen - English fiction - 1856 - 309 pages
...opinion of other people. I thought our judgments were given us merely to be subservient to those of neighbours. This has always been your doctrine, I...behaviour. You must not confound my meaning. I am guihy, I confess, of having often wished you to treat our acquaintance in general with greater attention;...
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Sense and Sensibility and Persuasion ...

Jane Austen - 1864 - 530 pages
...opinion of other people. I thought our judgments were given us merely to be subservient to those of neighbours. This has always been your doctrine, I...when have I advised you to adopt their sentiments or to conform to their judgment in serious matters?" " You have not been able, then, to bring your sister...
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Sense and Sensibility

Jane Austen - 1892 - 548 pages
...other people. I thought our judgments were given us merely to be subservient to those of our neighbors. This has always been your doctrine, I am sure." "...All I have ever attempted to influence has been the belavior. You must not confound my meaning. I am guilty, I confess, of having often wished you to treat...
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Sense and Sensibility, Volume 1

Jane Austen - 1892
...other people. I thought our judgments were given us merely to be subservient to those of our neighbors. This has always been your doctrine, I am sure." "...All I have ever attempted to influence has been the behavior. You must not confound my meaning. I am guilty, I confess, of having often wished you to treat...
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Sense and Sensibility, Volume 1

Jane Austen - 1899 - 264 pages
...other people. I thought our judgments were given us merely to be subservient to those of our neighbors. This has always been your doctrine, I am sure." "'No,...All I have ever attempted to influence has been the behavior. You must not confound my meaning. I am guilty, I confess, of having often wished you to treat...
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Sense and Sensibility

Jane Austen - Domestic fiction - 1913 - 394 pages
...This has always been your doctrine, I am sure." "No, Marianne, never. My doctrine has never aimed 35 at the subjection of the understanding. All I have...general with greater attention ; but when have I advised 40 you to adopt their sentiments or conform to their judgment in serious matters?" t "You have not...
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Sense and Sensibility

Jane Austen - 1922 - 372 pages
...they say of themselves, and very frequently by what other people say of them, without giving oneself time to deliberate and judge." " But I thought it...wished you to treat our acquaintance in general with G greater attention; but when have I advised you to adopt their sentiments or conform to their judgment...
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Jane Austen

Francis Warre Cornish - 1929 - 240 pages
...controls works for her that is scorned and ridiculed by Marianne, who will have no recourse to it: 'But I thought it was right, Elinor,' said Marianne,...the behaviour. You must not confound my meaning.' Marianne's actions are guided by rules too, but those rules are very different from Elinor's. Obedience...
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Those Elegant Decorums: The Concept of Propriety in Jane Austen's Novels

Jane Nardin - Literary Criticism - 1973 - 168 pages
...laws and minor laws — as a regulator of social action. " 'My doctrine,' " Elinor tells Marianne, " 'has never aimed at the subjection of the understanding....All I have ever attempted to influence has been the behavior' " (p. 74). Though Elinor forms her own ideas about people and events, she is deeply convinced...
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