Sense and Sensibility: a Novel

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Richard Bentley, 1833 - 331 pages
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By far better than P&P, just more mature and wise is Austen in this.

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Jane Austen is a fabulous author, and this is my favourite of her books. Marianne has been my Heroine for many years now, and certanitly my favourite Austen character. What more can I say than that I love this book, and highly reccomend it!

Selected pages

Contents

I
xv
II
3
III
8
IV
13
V
18
VI
21
VII
24
VIII
28
XXVII
139
XXVIII
146
XXIX
150
XXX
161
XXXI
169
XXXII
179
XXXIII
186
XXXIV
195

IX
31
X
37
XI
43
XII
47
XIII
51
XIV
58
XV
62
XVI
69
XVII
74
XVIII
79
XIX
84
XX
92
XXI
98
XXII
106
XXIII
115
XXIV
121
XXV
127
XXVI
132
XXXV
202
XXXVI
209
XXXVII
218
XXXVIII
230
XXXIX
238
XL
243
XLI
250
XLII
257
XLIII
262
XLIV
272
XLV
286
XLVI
292
XLVII
300
XLVIII
307
XLIX
311
L
322
Copyright

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Page 81 - I am convinced,' said Edward, 'that you really feel all the delight in a fine prospect which you profess to feel. But, in return, your sister must allow me to feel no more than I profess. I like a fine prospect, but not on picturesque principles. I do not like crooked, twisted, blasted trees. I admire them much more if they are tall, straight and flourishing. I do not like ruined, tattered cottages. I am not fond of nettles, or thistles, or heath blossoms. I have more pleasure in a snug farm-house...
Page 148 - Marianne, as if wishing to avoid her eye, and determined not to observe her attitude, inquired in a hurried manner after Mrs. Dashwood, and asked how long they had been in town. Elinor was robbed of all presence of mind by such an address, and was unable to say a word. But the feelings of her sister were instantly expressed. Her face was crimsoned over, and she exclaimed in a voice of the greatest emotion, " Good God ! Willoughby, what is the meaning of this ? Have you not received my letters ? Will...
Page 325 - Mrs. Ferrars to his choice, and re-established him completely in her favour. The whole of Lucy's behaviour in the affair, and the prosperity which crowned it, therefore, may be held forth as a most encouraging instance of what an earnest, an unceasing attention to self-interest, however its progress may be apparently obstructed, will do in securing every advantage of fortune, with no other sacrifice than that of time and conscience.
Page 134 - They reached town by three o'clock the third day, glad to be released, after such a journey, from the confinement of a carriage, and ready to enjoy all the luxury of a good fire. The house was handsome, and handsomely fitted up, and the young ladies were immediately put in possession of a very comfortable apartment. It had formerly been Charlotte's, and over the mantelpiece still hung a landscape in coloured silks of her performance, in proof of her having spent seven years at a great school in town...
Page 327 - She was born to discover the falsehood of her own opinions, and to counteract, by her conduct, her most favourite maxims. She was borne to overcome an affection formed so late in life as at seventeen, and with no sentiment superior to strong esteem and lively friendship, voluntarily to give her hand to another! — and that other, a man who had suffered no...
Page 170 - She expected from other people the same opinions and feelings as her own, and she judged of their motives by the immediate effect of their actions on herself.
Page 48 - in supposing I know very little of Willoughby. I have not known him long, indeed ; but I am much better acquainted with him than I am with any other creature in the world, except yourself and mamma. It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy ; it is disposition alone.
Page 78 - to be guided wholly by the opinion of other people. I thought our judgments were given us merely to be subservient to those of our neighbours. This has always been your doctrine, I am sure." "No, Marianne, never. My doctrine has never aimed at the subjection of the understanding. All I have ever attempted to influence has been the behaviour. You must not confound my meaning. I am guilty, I confess, of having often wished you to treat our acquaintance in general with greater attention; but when have...
Page v - ... separately good. Their assemblage produced an unrivalled expression of that cheerfulness, sensibility, and benevolence, which were her real characteristics. Her complexion was of the finest texture. It might with truth be said, that her eloquent blood spoke through her modest cheek. Her voice was extremely sweet. She delivered herself with fluency and precision. Indeed she was formed for elegant and rational society, excelling in conversation as much as in composition.

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