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suddenly announced that Cousin Janie at the Cape, she's dead,' and persisted in repeating his information. I wrote down the day and hour, and told my mother and sisters.' Then the Cape mail brought the news that Janie had been badly burned and had died on that very Sunday. But neither mother nor sisters have any distinct remembrance that an occurrence which would have impressed most ladies took place at all, and the witness herself now says, 'I have no record in writing.' Mr. G. A. W., in No. 273, when sitting on deck in the Red Sea in 1876, heard his brother address him, took a note of the day and hour, and a fortnight later got a letter of the same date from his mother saying that the brother, at whose deathbed she had been sitting, had just expired. But no further reference is made to this letter, and the note I had made of the occurrence at the time no longer exists.' In No. 345, a gentleman then in Hong Kong appeared on the 21st of August, 1869, to his boy in England, 'walking round his bed;' a few hours after appeared to his sister, the witness Mrs. C., in the same house, 'seated in a chair, and with a deathly pallor on his face,' and wound up by calling me by name three times.' Naturally 'I said I should make a note of it, which I did,' and the next mail from China brought the intelligence of his sudden death on the day required (or at least on the day which this narrator, like others whose stories are admitted into these records, forgetting the change required by the longitude, supposes to be the day required). But her husband on being applied to says, 'I fear that she has not in fact any evidence now'; and in particular, She has no note now in her possession.' All these cases are marked first-hand, while Mr. W., of Yorkshire, whom the difference of longitude rather confirms, is injuriously relegated to the second class (No. 495). Yet he, in 1851, when sleeping in Nevada City, saw his great-aunt from England enter his bedroom in her outdoor walking costume, as worn in 1842, the bonnet being a prominent part of it,' and calling him 'George!' She died in Yorkshire that day; while in Nevada a note was made on the back of a letter, and used for reference when the news arrived; but this was not kept.' The only witness of this group (No. 297) who has frankly destroyed her note is Miss P., of Fulham, who consequently does not know even the year when her brother, then in Australia, appeared in her kitchen in England with a wet monkey-jacket on, and with the remarkable words on his lips, For God's sake, don't say I'm here!' He then vanished, and on returning from Australia told her how that night, but two hours later, he was nearly drowned in Melbourne when ashore without leave. The inexorable longitude here again shows that he must have appeared in his wet state in Fulham ten hours before he slipped into the sea in Melbourne; but what we are interested in is the note made of the date: 'I destroyed the note I made of the date as soon as I had verified it, not think

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night, 25 of March 1880. R. B. W. B. God forbid!' How does the writer explain the four initials?

Though I distinctly recognised my brother's features, the idea flashed upon me that the figure bore some slight resemblance to my most intimate and valued friend, Colonel B., and in my dread of impending evil to one to whom I am so much attached (Colonel B., not the brother) I wrote the four initials, R. B. for my brother and W. B. for Colonel B. . . . The figure I saw was that of my brother, and, in my anxious state of mind, I worried myself into the belief that possibly it might be that of my old friend, as a resemblance did exist in the fashion of their beards. I can give you no further explanations, nor can I produce further testimony in support of my assertions.

There can, I suppose, be no doubt that Mr. W.'s assertion that he had seen his brother's wraith is weakened rather than supported by his documentary evidence-evidence which he admits that no one saw till after the news of death reached him through the ordinary channels. Yet all the other cases are more doubtful still. The Rev. A. J. heard a voice in 1854 (No. 153) saying, 'Your brother Mark and Harriet are both gone'; and 'before I left my bedroom I wrote the words down on a scrap of an old newspaper. The same day I entered the incident in my diary, which I still have-a transcript from the bit of newspaper.' The newspaper is lost: the supposed copy Mr. Gurney has seen, and he remarks

I had hoped to be able to incorporate it verbatim in the account; but Mr. J. has private reasons-quite unconnected with the present case-for desiring that this

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should not be done.

Mrs. T. (No. 168) was at Adelaide on Nov. 18, 1863, and saw a former lover appear along with a friend, at midnight,

having a look of unutterable sorrow on his face, and deadly pale. He never opened his lips, but I read his heart as if it were an open book, and it said, 'My father is dead, and I have come into his property.' I answered,' How much you have grown like your father!' [The lady's husband and brother rather made fun of this unsatisfactory interview, so] I determined to write it down in my diary and see if the news were verified. And from that diary I am now quoting.

Her husband, she states, was profoundly struck when he afterwards saw this diary' corresponding exactly to the news in the letter I had that moment received;' and it would be interesting to every reader of this book to know whether its editor was equally struck when he saw it. In these circumstances all that we have is this: Mrs. T. has shown to one of us a memorandum of the appearance of two figures under date November 18 in her diary of the year 1863.' Of course an entry in a diary by no means proves its own date; but unless the editors have the worst opinion of this entry we should not have been left with a notice of it so meagre and suspicious. In No. 98 they are equally reticent; but the entry which they have seen there is, 'At night I dreamt that the kitchen in my father's house was on fire. I awoke and found that it was 1 A.M.' In point of fact it was the attic, not

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