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MISCELLANY.

Hundreds of intelligent and impartial friends of the Indians have expressed to President Harrison their desire that the

present Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Hon. John H. Oberly, may be continued in that important office. They say:

During his brief incumbency he has given entire satisfaction to many friends of the Indians who are unofficially and gratuitously laboring for the advancement of this people, and who have had the best opportunities for estimating the practical value of Mr. Oberly's services to the government. We believe that the most serious and dangerous abuses connected with the Indian service in the past-abuses which have brought discredit to the nation, misery and destruction to the Indian, and have cost the lives of many of our own people-may be traced directly to the appointment of bad or incompetent men as Indian agents and employes, as a reward for partisan services. Mr. Oberly favors the abolition of the spoils system in the Indian service, and the introduction of the merit system in its place, whereby men of character and ability may be appointed to places of trust among the Indians, irrespective of

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The Choctaw Presbytery, taking action on the death of Rev. T. H. Byington, which occurred December 21, 1888, say:

His death was tragical, for he fell by the hand of an assassin.

It was thought that he had not an enemy in the world; but even his pure and lofty character was not free from the shaft of malice and the arrow of hatred.

He was greatly respected and beloved throughout the Choctaw country; frequently called upon to assist in the administration of the government; ready to help any in need of advice or means.

There remain his widow and five children to mourn his loss with us.

In all departments of his life, whether as a Christian minister, an honored citizen, a successful administrator, a faithful statesman, a loving husband or a wise father, he ever sought to honor his Lord and Master.

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Annual Contributions-Home Mission Appointments.

[July,

ANNUAL CONTRIBUTIONS.

For churches that have not yet adopted the scheme of weekly offerings set forth in the Directory for Worship, chapter vi., it is recommended by the General Assembly that the first Lord's day of the following months be set apart for contributions to the boards:

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[All notices, etc., with reference to deceased ministers should be sent to Rev. W. H. Roberts, D.D., Lane Theological Seminary, Cincinnati, O.] DONALDSON, ALEXANDER-born, Fairfield, Westmoreland county, Pa., August 30, 1808; graduated, Jefferson College, 1835, Western Theological Seminary, 1839; ordained by Saltsburg Presbytery, June 20, 1839; pastor, Elders Ridge and Currie's Run, Pa., 1839-53, Elders Ridge,

1857-89; principal Elders Ridge Academy, 184785; died, Elders Ridge, Pa., April 18, 1889. Married Miss Mary S. Bracken, May 30, 1839; also married to Miss Sarah R. Craighead. Of six sons and two daughters, but one daughter survives. Received the honorary degree of D.D.

NOTICES OF BOOKS.

WAYS THAT WIN, by Mrs. Caroline Starr Morgan, is an interesting "Tale of a Year," intended to illustrate the happiness which young people may secure and the usefulness which they may achieve by associating themselves in a Christian congregation, in a Christian spirit, for Christian work. The writer assumes, rather than sets forth, the evangelical convictions and experience in her young people which are the only real root and source of such Christian happiness and usefulness. With that assumption realized, the ways of Christian usefulness are as pleasant as she pictures them. Her book is published by the American Baptist Publication Society, 1420 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. There is not a sentence in it which would show the reader that it was written by a member of that denomination.

LETTERS TO A DAUGHTER. LETTERS TO ELDER DAUGHTERS. These are two small volumes by Mrs. Helen Ekin Starrett, published by A. C. McClurg & Co., Chicago. THE FUTURE OF EDUCATED WOMEN, by the same author, is bound with another treatise by her sister, Mrs. Frances Ekin Allison, entitled MEN, WOMEN AND MONEY, published by Jansen, McClurg & Co., Chicago. These treatises are well written and abound with valuable thoughts. They are Christian and evangelical in sentiment and spirit. While they intimate some expectations for women in the near future, of the value of which we are not convinced, they are mainly occupied with advice to young women which we regard as eminently wholesome and helpful. The price of "Letters to Elder Daughters" is 75 cents; each of the others, 50

cents.

GLEANINGS AT HOME AND ABROAD.

There are now eighty-two medical missionaries in China, the majority of whom are from the United States; sixteen of them are female physicians. There are large mission hospitals and dispensaries in Pekin, Tientsin, Shanghai and Canton, and smaller ones at various other cities. At these hospitals, where many thousands are treated yearly, and at the homes of other sick people, the teaching of the gospel of Christ hand in hand with the medical treat

goes

ment, and the good accomplished is very great. In no part of the world is the medical missionary more highly appreciated than within the Chinese empire, and a great part of the current expenses of the hospitals and dispensaries are borne by Chinese officials, the gentry and the merchants. Foreigners residing in China also give a good deal. If there were one hundred medical missionaries in China among three hundred millions of people, each physician would have more than twice as many people to attend as there are living in New York.-Medical Missionary Record.

At Paranagamana, Ceylon, a young Buddhist named Sayasundere, impressed by the teaching of our agents and under deep conviction of sin, sought baptism, but died before the probation to which we thought it right to submit him was over. His friends claimed for him a Buddhist funeral, but our teachers were permitted to be present. After the Buddhist ceremony, with all its indications of hopelessness for the future, our agents preached to the crowd the gospel of hope and immortality through Christ. The priests as well as the people remained to the close. Shortly after this event a brother of the deceased, a clever native doctor who had been foremost in persecuting Sayasundere for his attachment to Christianity, declared that he no longer could rest in Buddhism, and asked for further instruction in the doctrines of Christianity. He is now we believe truly converted and will shortly be baptized.-Wesleyan Missionary.

"Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.”

A Chinese Christian lady brought her jewels one morning to her husband, to build an opium

refuge; and when he expressed surprise, she said, "I have taken Christ for my adornment, and surely that is enough for any Christian woman."-Missionary Link.

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Bishop Turner of the African Methodist Church says: Africa is the richest continent under the canopy of heaven. Her natural resources are incalculable. England and other European countries keep two hundred ships hugging her coasts the year around, pouring her wealth into their coffers; and this country could double the number by utilizing the Negro, if it could just look beyond its prejudices and adjust itself to its possibilities. A line of steamers between Charleston, Savannah, New Orleans or Wilmington and Africa could in a few years be made to flood the land with unnumbered millions of money. The Negro as an agent might be made a thousand fold more valuable to the South than he was as a slave, and at the same time more valuable to himself as a freeman. If England can keep steamer lines running all the time burdened with gold-dust, ivory, coffee, cam-wood, palmoil and a thousand other things which bring wealth and give business to the world, why cannot this country, with millions of men at its disposal adapted to the climate of Africa and as faithful to their trust as any race in the world, do as much or more? If the Negro is a burden, a menace and source of vexation to our white friends, let them open up a highway to the land of his ancestry by a line of steamers, cheap transportation and a little business thrown in, and the 'dark Negro problem' will solve itself in a few years."-Spirit of Missions.

Here is an item from an exchange giving the result of abstinence in an Irish town: "In 1846 a gentleman by the name of Richardson started a linen factory in Armagh, Ireland. There are now four thousand inhabitants, who earn nearly half a million dollars a year. There are three churches and two good schools, a public library, a town hall, a saving bank, a post office, some stores, a drug-store, a doctor's office and a temperance hotel. There is not a place where a drop of strong drink can be had; there is not a drinking person in town; there is no jail, no poor-house, no hospital, no police station, not even a policeman !"-Cumberland Presbyterian.

It is

RECEIPTS.

Synods in SMALL CAPITALS; Presbyteries in italic; Churches in Roman.

great importance to the treasurers of all the boards that when money is sent to them, the name of the church from which it comes, and of the presbytery to which the church belongs, should be distinctly written, and that the person sending should sign his or her name distinctly, with proper title, e. g., Pastor, Treasurer, Miss or Mrs., as the case may be. Careful attention to this will save much trouble and perhaps prevent serious mistakes.

RECEIPTS FOR THE BOARD OF CHURCH ERECTION, APRIL 11 TO 30, 1889.

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ILLINOIS.-Alton-Carlinville, 9 60; Edwardsville, 80 cts. Bloomington-Fairbury, 10; Rossville, 3 50. Cairo-Harrisburg, 2 59. Chicago-Austin, 4 29; Chicago 1st, 85 38; Chicago 5th, 13 87; Chicago Holland, 3; Evanston, 67 38; Glenwood, 1; Homewood, 3 63; Itaska, 2. Mattoon-Bethel, 1; Robinson, 10 29; Shelbyville, 17. Peoria-Eureka, 9 43; Peoria 1st, 14 25; Princeville, 21 05. Rock River-Geneseo, 3. Schuyler-Quincy 1st sab-sch., 23. Springfield—Virginia,

5.

311 06

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MINNESOTA.-Mankato-Blue Earth City, 10. St. PaulMinneapolis Bethlehem, 65 cts.: Stillwater ist, 8 06; White Bear Lake (incl. sab-sch., 1 25), 6.

24 71

20 05 Nebraska City

MISSOURI. Kansas City-Creighton, 4; Greenwood, 2. Ozark-Bolivar, 5 05. Palmyra-Macon, 1. St. Louis-De Soto, 3; St. Louis McCausland Ave., 5. NEBRASKA-Hastings-Bloomington, 1 88. -Lincoln 1st, 50. Omaha-South Omaha, 3. 54 88 NEW JERSEY. Elizabeth-Elizabeth 2d, 64 53; Elizabeth 3d, 35; Glen Garden, 1; Plainfield 1st, 18 67. Jersey City— Norwood, 2. Monmouth-South Amboy, 1. Morris and Orange-Pleasant Grove, 5. Newark-Newark Calvary, 6 80; Newark Plane St., 1. New Brunswick-Princeton 2d, 11 86; Princeton Witherspoon St., 1. Newton-Asbury, 25; Knowlton, 56 cts. West Jersey-Clayton, 10.

183 42

Genera

NEW YORK.-Albany-Albany Madison Ave., 20; Northville, 2 65; Saratoga Springs 2d sab-sch., 8 46; Schenectady 1st, 7 87. Brooklyn Brooklyn Ainslie St., 5; Brooklyn Noble St., 15; Brooklyn Prospect Heights, 10; Brooklyn Siloam, 1; Brooklyn Trinity sab-sch., 6 56. Buffalo-Buffalo Wells St., 2: East Hamburg, 5; Jamestown 1st, 50. -Canandaigua 1st, 10. Hulson-Milford, 3; Washingtonville 2d, 4. Long Island-Moriches, 3 42; Shelter Island, 3. Nassou-Newtown, 2. New York-New York 5th Ave., 135; New York Allen St., 2; New York Madison Sq., 646 68; New York Mt. Washington, 4; New York West, 10. NiagaraKnowlesville, 8. North River-Bethlehem, 16; Cold Spring, Otsego-Milford 1st, 2. Rochester-Rochester 1st, 245 88; Rochester Emanuel, 34 cts. Troy-Hebron, 1; Lansingburg 1st, 47 50. Westchester-New Haven 1st, 7. 1302 76

19.

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1. Maumee-Pemberville, 4. St. Clairsville-Bellaire 1st, 13. Steubenville-Cross Creek, 5; New Philadelphia, 1; Richmond ch, and sab-sch., 3 34; Salineville, 10; Steubenville 3d, 3. Zanesville-Madison, Interest on Matthew Scott Fund, 20; New Concord, 5; Norwich, 2; Uniontown, 1 50. 174 13 PACIFIC.-Benicia Shiloh, 5. Los Angeles-Anaheim 1st (including sab-sch., 2 70), 5 90; Fullerton, 1 40; Ontario, 4; Santa Barbara 1st, 15; Tustin, 12 25. San Francisco-Brooklyn, 41. San José-Templeton, 5.

89 55 PENNSYLVANIA.-Allegheny-Concord, 2; Glenshaw (incl. sab-sch., 2 53), 16 08; Natrona, 3. Blairsville-Derry, 11 65; Salem, 20 04. Butler-Centre, 6; Petrolia, 1. Carlisle-Wells Valley, 40 cts. Chester-New London, 10; Ridley Park, 13 70; Wayne, 5. Clarion-Elkton, 3 75; Greenville, 3 89. ErieGreenfield, 1; Sandy Lake, 1. Huntingdon-Beulah, 2; Curwensville sab-sch., 5; Houtzdale, 361; Lewistown, 7 76. Kittanning-Atwood, 2; Clarksburg, 4; Ebenezer, 4; Mt. Pleasant, 3; Rockbridge, 3. Lackawanna-Honesdale 1st, 29 75; West Pittston, 35; Wilkesbarre Memorial, 40 62. LehighBrainerd, 20; Pen Argyl, 5; Reading 1st sab-sch., 25; Reading Washington St., 2; Stroudsburg 1st, 5. NorthumberlandWilliamsport 3d, 19 05. Philadelphia-Philadelphia Mariner's, 6 88. Philadelphia North-Eddington, 5; Port Kennedy, 4. Pittsburgh-Lebanon, 25; Miller's Run, 2; North Branch, 1; Pittsburgh 2d, 4 46; Pittsburgh East Liberty (incl. sab-sch., 75 17), 105 46; Pittsburgh 43d St., 14; Pittsburgh Shady Side sab-sch. Miss'y Soc., 15. Redstone Greensboro', 2; Somerset, 2. Washington-Allen Grove, 4; Bethlehem sab-sch., 1 84; Cameron, 2. Wellsboro-Wellsboro', Westminster-Pine Grove, 3. West Virginia-Winfield,

4 94.
7 35.

SOUTH DAKOTA.-Southern Dakota-Sioux Falls,
TENNESSEE.-Holston-St. Mark's, 1.

2d, 30.

524 23 12.90

31 00

28 00

Union-Knoxville
TEXAS.-Austin — Brownwood, 12; Galveston St. Paul's
Ger., 5; Lampasas, 1; San Angelo, 10.
UTAH.-Utah-American Fork, 6; Mt. Pleasant, 2. 8. 00
WISCONSIN.-Chippewa — Hudson, 6 61. La Crosse-La
Crosse 1st, 3 38. Lake Superior-Negaunee, 21; Oconto, 16 50,
Madison-Baraboo, 8 58. Winnebago-Fremont, 2; Oshkosh, 6.

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MANSE FUND.

KANSAS.-Larned-Sterling Y. P. S. C. E.,
NEW YORK.-Albany-Schenectady 1st,
PENNSYLVANIA. Carlisle - Harrisburg
Market Square, 3. Northumberland
Williamsport 3d, 2 25.

10 00

26 66

50.00

350 00
500 00

936 66

110 4.00

$5226 38

525

10 35

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