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CHILDREN'S CHURCH AT HOME AND ABROAD.

A JOURNEY TO PERSIA,

More than one of the little Presbyterians who read THE CHURCH AT HOME AND ABROAD, or whose mothers read it to them, have sent me their request that I will tell them more about the journey to Persia which I took four years ago. The map on the opposite page will help you to understand what I am now going to tell you. I hope you will keep this number carefully, so that you can use this map again if I shall tell you more about my travels in Persia in

future numbers.

At the top of this map you see a part of the Black Sea-the part of it which washes its southern shore, the northern edge of Turkey. You know that its northern shore is the southern boundary of that part of Russia. My son, who is now a missionary in Syria, was with me in that journey, and neither of us had ever been so far from home before. We had spent eleven days in Constantinople, which you see at the top of

the

map, on the left hand. The missionaries there had been very kind to us and shown us many interesting things in that wonderful city. We sailed away from Constantinople on the Austrian steamship Mars, September 27, 1884, and voyaged along near the southern shore. Usually we were sailing at night and lying at anchor through the day near some port on the shore. The men would be taking goods from the ship to the shore in row-boats, and bringing other goods from the shore to the ship. Whenever we wished, we could go ashore and take a walk. through the queer, narrow streets of a Turkish town or out upon the hills near by. You see that this was a good deal like sailing along the southern shore of Lake Erie

from Toledo to Buffalo, and stopping at Sandusky and Cleveland, as we did at Samsoun and Trebizond. Samsoun is not put down on this map, but I remember our vessel stopping there. When our first missionaries went to Persia, more than fifty years ago, and for a good many years afterwards, they used to land at Trebizond, and then travel on horseback, over those mountains, all the long way to Oroomiah and to Tabreez; but now they land, as we did, at Batoum. This is a city much farther east than Trebizond. It is not represented on this map.

From that new and growing sea-port a railroad has been built to Tiflis and onward, in a southeasterly direction, beside the river which you see on the map, to the shore of the Caspian Sea. The sea-port where the railroad ends is named Baku, and near it are oil wells, from which oil flows abundantly, just as it does in the western part of Pennsylvania. When I first saw the great tanks of oil moving along on that railroad, I felt very proud, thinking that they were filled with oil brought from my own country; but I soon learned that that was a mistake. I generally find that being proud is a mistake. That range of mountains running between the words Russian and Territory on the map is Mount Caucasus. This mountain divides Europe from Asia, and a hundred years ago it was the southern boundary of Russia, but early in this century the Russians overcame the Persians in war and made them give up the country to them, down to that river which you see winding along from near Erzeroom, running just north of Mount Ararat, and then bend

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ing down much farther south. This is the river Aras, which was anciently named Araxes. The northern branch of it, which runs beside Tiflis, is named the Kur, from the great king Cyrus, or Kuros, as the Greeks wrote the name.

We landed from the steamship at Batoum in the evening of October 1, and on the next day made the railroad journey to Tiflis. For the first hour we were in sight of the sea on our left, which lay calm and still and beautiful under the bright morning sunlight.

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at a large and hanasome station-house, not so unlike those in our own country as we had expected to find it. There were plenty of carriages and porters, but no one that could speak English. Lazar Begh, whom the missionaries had sent up from Tabreez to meet us, by a misunderstanding about the time of our coming, was not at the station, and we had some difficulty in finding the hotel to which we wished to go, and on the next day to find Lazar; but when we had found him, he took excellent care of us,

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On our right, not far away, were high hills, which perhaps we should have called mountains if we had not just come from the Alps in Switzerland. Soon our road, bearing away from the sea, was winding up and over these heights. The frequent curves, the high, rocky cliffs, the clear stream, winding so that we often crossed it, made the whole view very beautiful. I suppose we were really crossing a spur of Mount Caucasus.

It was ten o'clock at night when we arrived in Tiflis. This is a city of over a hundred thousand people, and we stopped

and made all necessary provision for our journey.

From Tiflis we went about sixty miles further by the railroad to Akstafa, and the carriage which Lazar engaged for us at Tiflis was carried on a freight-car to the same place. Then we had four days journey to Djulfa, on the river Aras. This is not put down on the map, but it is some distance east of Okhoi, just where the river touches the boundary line. This journey was on a post-road made and owned by the Russian government. The govern

368

Mount Ararat-River Aras.

ment also owned the carriage, which we hired of an officer. At the post-house in Akstafa we were supplied with horses for our carriage, and a man to drive them to the next post-house. Then he would take that team home and another would be supplied to us in the same way. From one post-house to the next would sometimes be not more than ten or twelve miles, and sometimes twenty miles or more. At night we were permitted to sleep in the post-house on wide wooden benches, spreading under us and over us bed-quilts which we bought at Tiflis and carried in our carriage. We had also a bag of bread, which Lazar bought for us at Tiflis, and which, you may believe, became very dry before we reached Djulfa. We could generally buy milk or eggs, sometimes fish or a chicken, which Lazar would cook for us over a little fire which he would kindle out-of-doors, just as you do at picnics. He could always hire a nice tea-urn, which the Russians call a simevar, and make us as delicious and refreshing tea as I ever drank.

On the third morning, as we started on our way from Eriwan, I saw on our right a mountain with two high peaks covered with snow from their tops far down their sides, one of the noblest mountains I had ever When Lazar saw me looking with wonder at it, he told me that that was Mount Ararat. As my sight swept over a wide circuit including many lower peaks, I could readily believe that we were passing among the mountains of Ararat, over which

seen.

$

Elsie Sterrett, of Logansport, Ind., of Logansport, Ind., writes:

I have found the verse Mr. Whipple writes about without the help of any one or anything but the Concordance. It is in Rev. 3:11.

I have also read those letters in the September number. I think the one written by

[October.

the ark floated when the flood covered them and on some one of which it rested as the flood subsided. Not unlikely Noah and his family all looked upon this noble Ararat, and they may have plowed the land and raised crops and flocks on the plains over which I was journeying. All that day, and all the next day till sunset, while we rode on southward, whenever we looked north, lofty Ararat, with its glittering white top, was in full view.

We rode two or three hours in the darkness of Saturday evening to reach Djulfa, on the north bank of the Aras. There we were on the border of Russia, expecting to sleep there and spend the Sabbath in the Russian post-house, and on Monday morning to cross over the river and be in Persia, with a long horseback journey before us, to reach our missionary friends at Tabreez. On Sabbath morning you can imagine how rejoiced we were when we found that two missionaries, Dr. Cochran and Rev. W. L. Whipple, had been so thoughtful and kind as to come all the way from Tabreez to meet us. They had lodged Saturday night on the Persian side of the river, and Sabbath morning they came across on the rude ferry-boat and spent the day with us. We heard no Sabbath bell. We saw no happy Christian people and children going to the house of God. But the very fatiguing journey of the past week had made us need the rest of the Sabbath. We enjoyed it even in that dreary post-house on the bank of the Araxes. H. A. N.

Rev. Albert Robinson, from Florence, Oregon, is the best, because I pity the children for I am always interested in children, as I who slept on the floor of an Indian house, am a little girl ten years old.

We have sent to this little friend, from whom we are glad to hear, the pictures of Goolee and Ali and Dr. Kendall.

RECEIPTS.

Synods in SMALL CAPITALS; Presbyteries in italic; Churches in Roman.

It is of great importance to the treasurers of all the boards that when money is sent to them, the name of the church from which it comes, and of the presbytery to which the church belongs, should be distinctly written, and that the person sending should sign his or her name distinctly, with proper title, e. g., Pastor, Treasurer, Miss or Mrs., as the case may be. Careful attention to this will save much trouble and perhaps prevent serious mistakes.

RECEIPTS FOR THE BOARD OF BALTIMORE.-Baltimore-Deer Creek Harmony, 28; Emmittsburg, 22 24; Lonaconing, 10; Piney Creek, 11 31. New Castle-Dover, 10; New Castle 1st, 55 62; St. George's, 2 30; Wilmington Central (incl. sab-sch., 3 82), 43 38; Wilmington Rodney St., 10. Washington City-Clifton, 2; Washington 1st, 10 03; Washington Metropolitan, 23 25.

228 13 CATAWBA.-Cape Fear-Raleigh Davis St., 1 00 COLORADO.-Boulder-Valmont, 20 cts. Pueblo-Las Animas, 13 85. Santa Fe-Albuquerque, 13.

27 05

COLUMBIA.-East Oregon-Lostine, 4. Idaho Spokane Falls, 16 10. Oregon-Crawfordsville, 4 80.

24.90

Rock

ILLINOIS-Alton-Chester 1st, 2. Bloomington-Gilman, 10: Minonk, 10 47. Cairo-Carmi, 8 65; Flora, 2 35. Chicago -Chicago 1st, 48 93; Chicago 1st Ger., 4; Chicago Fullerton Ave., 24 61; Peotone, 28 55. Peoria-Washington, 4. River-Centre, 7 60; Edgington, 7 75; Millersburg, 4; Peniel, 6; Pleasant Ridge, 1 50. Schuyler-Brooklyn, 3; Camp Creek, 7; Plymouth, 2 06; Prairie City, 4. SpringfieldMason City, 6 76; Pisgah, 1 92; Pleasant Plains, 6; Unity, 82 cts.

202 00

INDIANA-Crawfordsville-Bethany, 11. Fort Wayne-Fort Wayne 1st, 55 23; La Grange, 5 50; Líma, 3. IndianapolisColumbus, 3; Franklin 1st, 15 42; Indianapolis 4th (incl. sab-sch., 11 51), 23 48; Indianapolis 12th, 3 76. Logansport -South Bend 1st, 25. Muncie-Liberty, 3 80; Wabash, 2. New Albany-Hanover, 7 31; Madison 2d, 5; Sharon Hill, 2.50. Vincennes-Claiborne, 4; Evansville Grace, 9. 179 00 IOWA.-Cedar Rapids-Springville, 3 61. Council BluffsMt. Ayr, 5; Walnut, 3 85. Des Moines-Indianola, 7; Mariposa, 3. Dubuque-Dubuque 1st, 22; Hopkinton, 4 13. Fort Dodge-Dana, 7; Vail, 9 45. Iowa-Keokuk Westminster, 11 06; Kossuth 1st, 5 70; Libertyville, 2; Mt. Zion, 2 10; Ottumwa, 12 30. Iowa City-Ladora, 4; Marengo, 3 03. Waterloo-Clarksville, 5; Grundy Centre (incl. sab-sch., 1 29), 8; Janesville, 4.

122 23

KANSAS.-Emporia-Belle Plaine, 4; El Paso, 2; White City, 3 16; Wilsie, 1 84. Highland-Hiawatha 1st, 9 58; Highland, 8; Washington, 7 50. Larned-Sterling, 5. Neosho-Coffeyville ch. and sab-sch., 4 35; Humboldt 1st, 4 01. Solomon-Manchester 1st, 3; Scotch Plains, 2 30. TopekaEdgerton, 2 40.

57 14

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MISSOURI-Kansas City-Kansas City 1st, 36 50; Kansas City 2d, 138. Ozark-Webb City 1st, 9. Palmyra-Brookfield, 4 06. Platte-Mound City, 5 56. St. Louis-St. Louis Westminster, 9 90.

203 02 NEBRASKA-Hastings-Holdredge 1st, 12 60; Minden, 4. Kearney-Wilson Memorial, 2 40. Nebraska City-Auburn, 5 55; Firth, 1 67: Seward, 4 61; Tecumseh, 30. NiobraraRushville, 5; Wakefield, 4 82. Omaha Omaha Ambler Place, 3; Waterloo, 3 50.

77 15

NEW JERSEY.-Elizabeth-Pluckamin sab-sch., 3 20; Rahway 2d, 36; Roselle, 8 26. Jersey City-Arlington 1st sabsch., 10. Monmouth-Manasquan, 18 14. Morris and OrangeChatham, 30; Madison, 6 22; Morristown South St., 111 78; Orange 1st, 140; Orange 2d, 80 05; Summit Central, 63 84. Newark Newark 2d, 17 49. New Brunswick-Kirkpatrick Memorial, 5; New Brunswick 1st, 40 10; Trenton 1st, 115 62; Trenton Prospect St. sab-sch., 4 25. Newton-Phillipsburg Westminster, 4 29; Stillwater (incl. sab-sch., 1 20), 13 20. West Jersey-Bridgeton 2d, 14 05; Cedarville 1st, 7 07. 728 56 NEW YORK.-Albany-Albany State St., 51 82; Ballston Centre, 5 15; Carlisle, 3; Charlton, 10 75; Gloversville, 26 25; Jefferson, 9. Binghamton-Bainbridge, 23; Smithville Flats, 3 39. Boston-Newburyport 1st, 15 25; Portland, 5; Windham, 6 75. Brooklyn-Brooklyn Duryea, 30; Brooklyn Memorial, 97 97. Buffalo-Buffalo Westminster, 25 98; Franklinville 1st, 3 50; Silver Creek, 8. Cayuga-Aurora, 17 04. Champlain-Peru, 1. Chemung-Elmira Lake St., 10. Columbia-Ancram Lead Mines, 1 50. Genesee-Leroy, 27 25;

CHURCH ERECTION, JULY, 1889.

Warsaw, 44. Geneva-Manchester, 11; Naples, 5 53; West Fayette, 2 25. Hudson-Chester, 26 87; Florida 1st, 15 50; Goshen, 45; Haverstraw Central, 37; Middletown 20, 4 15; Palisades, 18. Long Island-Cutchogue, 4; Southampton, 51; West Hampton, 12. Lyons-Lyons, 24 81; Sodus 1st, 6 69. Nassau-Hempstead, 14 87; Smithtown, 25. New YorkNew York North, 40: New York West Farms, 5. OtsegoRichfield Springs, 784. Rochester-Geneseo 1st, 4; Lima, 10; Rochester 3d, 44 20; Victor, 11. St. Lawrence-Gouverneur, 18 07; Watertown 1st, 103 25. Steuben-Arkport, 89 cts.; Jasper, 5 43. Syracuse-Syracuse Park Central, 30. TroyHoosick Falls sab-sch., 10 81; Troy Woodside, 44 54. Westchester-Patterson, 8; Peekskill 2d, 9; Rye, add'l, 7. 1088 30 NORTH DAKOTA.-Fargo-Fargo 1st, 13 53. PembinaLarimore, 6 07.

19 60

OHIO.-Bellefontaine Spring Hills, 1 42. Chillicothe-Pisgah, 5. Cincinnati-Cincinnati 2d, 132 53; Cincinnati Cumminsville, 6 40. Cleveland-East Cleveland 1st, 20 26. Columbus-Central College, 6; Groveport, 4 29; Lithopolis, 2 50; Midway, 1 25; Mt. Sterling, 5. Dayton-Middletown, 17 13; South Charleston, 12 24; Xenia, 7. Lima-Turtle Creek, 5 60. Mahoning-Ellsworth, 10 65; Massillon 2d, 26 98; Poland, 4 65. Marion-Berlin, 1 40; Iberia, 2 75; Trenton, 2; West Berlin, 2 75. Maumee-Delta, 4. St. Clairsville-Mt. Pleasant, 14 83. Steubenville-Bethel, 17 55; Hopedale, 4; Irondale, 2 90; Madison, 2 70. Wooster-Ashland 1st, 6 74; Belleville, 2 15; Doylestown, 4 40; Marshallville, 1 30; Orrville, 3. Zanesville-Brownsville, 6; Madison, 14 25. 361 62 PACIFIC.-Benicia-San Rafael (incl. sab-sch., 23 85), 39 35; Tomales, 3; Two Rocks, 7. Los Angeles-San Diego, 50. San Francisco-West Berkeley, 2 45. San José-Pleasant Valley,

5 67.

107 47 PENNSYLVANIA.-Allegheny-Allegheny North, 66 73; Allegheny Providence, 32 50; Evans City, 4; Fairmount, 3 11; Freedom, 5; Glenfield, 4 50; Pine Creek 1st, 4; Pleasant Hill, 2; Rochester, 3 58. Blairsville-Fairfield, 8 02; Irwin, 5 22; New Salem, 17; Poke Run, 20; Unity, 19 25. ButlerAllegany, 1; Summit, 6; Zelienople, 2 88. Carlisle-Big Spring, 24 45; Carlisle 1st, 20 29; Carlisle 2d, 53 73; Mechanicsburg, 6 10; Mercersburg, 23 64; Shippensburg, 14; Silver Spring, 5; St. Thomas, 4 76. Chester-Downingtown Central, 15 30; Honeybrook, 16 64; Penningtonville, 4 16. Clarion-Brockwayville, 4 16; Clarion, 16 53. Erie-Cambridge, 8; Cool Spring, 5 11; Erie Chestnut St., 5 67; Evansburg, 2; Fairview, 3; Garland, 5 78; Girard, 4 69; Harbor Creek, 3; Miles Grove Branch, 2 36; Northeast, 31; Pittsfield, 3 32; Stoneboro', 4 69; Sunville, 4; Utica, 9 29. Huntingdon-Altoona 3d, 7 54; Beulah, 2; Bradford, 1; Buffalo Run, 3 56; Houtzdale, 4 20; Hublersburg, 2; Lick Run, 1; Milesburg, 5; Petersburg (including sab-sch., 1 49), 4 04; Spruce Creek, 25; Waterside, 1. Kittanning-Cherry Tree, 4 55 East Union, 155; Marion, 4 50; Slate Lick, 17; Śrader's Grove, 3 05; West Glade Run, 7; Worthington, 6. Lackawanna-Troy, 15 75; Wilkesbarre Westminster, 5. Lehigh -Easton Brainerd, 27 31; South Easton, 2. Northumberland -Buffalo, 5 89; Lycoming, 15; Mifflinburg 1st, 5 53; New Berlin, 5 15. Philadelphia Philadelphia 1st (including sab-sch., 25), 368 82. Philadelphia Central — Philadelphia Bethesda, 16; Philadelphia Princeton, 130 41. Philadelphia North-Frankford, 10 79; Holmesburg, 5; Macalester Memorial, 2 79; Mt. Airy, 17; Newtown, 55 63. PittsburghCannonsburg 1st, 2; Cannonsburg Central, 7 30; Crafton, 15; Hazlewood, 26 69; Hebron, 20; McDonald, 14 83; McKee's Rock, 6; Mt. Pisgah, 10; Pittsburgh 1st, 353 10; Pittsburgh 3d, 248 31; Pittsburgh 4th, 18 18; Pittsburgh Shady Side, 7 60; Swissvale, 24 71; West Elizabeth, 6; Wilkinsburg, 40 76. Redstone-Brownsville, 4; Dunlap's Creek, 15; Little Redstone, 4 50; McKeesport, 93 12; Scottdale (including sab-sch., 180), 7; West Newton, 21 27. Shenango Leesburg, 10; Little Beaver, 3 23; New Castle 2d, 12. Washington Cove, 3; Frankfort, 11 80; Mt. Prospect, 15 50; Upper Buffalo, 26 70; Washington 1st, 42 50; Waynesburg, 5; Wheeling 1st, 26 23. Wellsboro'-Beecher Island, 4; Coudersport, 4 79: Farmington, 3; Wellsboro', 5 70. Westminster -Bellevue, 5 25; Centre (including sab-sch., 6 75), 12 57; Slate Ridge, 7. 2437 16

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NEW JERSEY.-Morris and Orange-Orange 1st Ver........

Total...........

15.50

$215 25

If acknowledgment of any remittance is not found in these reports, or if they are inaccurate in any item, prompt advice should be sent to the secretary of the Board, giving the number of the receipt held, or, in the absence of a receipt, the date, amount and form of remittance.

ADAM CAMPBELL, Treasurer, 53 Fifth Avenue, New York.

AND ACADEMIES, JULY, 1889.

OHIO.-Bellefontaine -Spring Hills, 1 06. CincinnatiCincinnati 2d, 167 66. St. Clairsville-Coal Brook, 2 47.

171 19 PENNSYLVANIA.-Blairsville-New Alexandria, 1770. Carliste-Gettysburg, 5 50. Erie-Harmonsburg, 2. Huntingdon-Beulah, 1; Houtzdale, 3 15. Lackawanna-Great Bend, 2 50. Philadelphia-Philadelphia 1st, 141 83; Philadelphia 3d, 14 38. Pittsburgh-Pittsburgh Shady Side, 7 60. Redstone -Brownsville, 4. Shenango Clarksville sab-sch., 13 39; Rich Hill, 10. Washington-Washington 1st, 17 71. Wellsboro'-Wellsboro', 4 28.

TEXAS.-Trinity-Albany,

PERSONAL.

Mrs. Jane F. Willard, Auburn, N. Y., 1000; Mrs. G. W. B. Cushing, East Orange, N. J., 10; Jas. M. Ham, Brooklyn, N. Y., 100; J. A. Gould, Seattle, Wash. Ter., 10; Rev. J. M. Leonard, Kanazawa, Japan, 5; Rev. W. L. Tarb t and wife, Springfield, Ill., 1 29; "C., Pa.," 3; William Schramm, Kearney, Neb., 90 cts.; Rev. E. P. Baker, Boulder, Col., 4 75..

Total receipts for July, 1889... Previously reported...

Total from May 1, 1889..

245 04

140

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C. M. CHARNLEY, Treasurer, P. O. Box 294, Chicago, Ill.

RECEIPTS FOR EDUCATION, JULY, 1889.

ATLANTIC.-Atlantic-James Island, 1. Fairfield-Ebenezer, 1; Good Will, 3.

5 00

BALTIMORE-New Castle-Rock, 5. Washington CityWashington 1st, 9 20.

14 20

13

COLORADO.-Boulder-Valmont, ILLINOIS.-Chicago-Chicago 1st, 48 88; Chicago 1st Ger., 4; Chicago 4th, 103 44. Ottanca-Paw Paw, 5; Plato, 3. Peoria-French Grove, 3; Knoxville, 10 91. Schuyler- Prairie City, 8. Springfield—Irish Grove, 6; Pisgah, 1 45; Sweet Water, 2; Unity, 63 cts.

196 31 INDIANA.-Crawfordsville-Dayton, 14 80; Rockville, 15 17. Indianapolis-Franklin 1st, 20 90. Muncie-Hopewell, 4; Liberty, 3 80; Wabash, 1 25. 59 92 6221

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NEW YORK.-Albany-Albany State St., 32 39; Ballston Centre, 3 43; Greenbush, 8. Brooklyn-Brooklyn Throop Ave. sab-sch, Miss. Soc., 20. Buffalo-Buffalo Breckenridge St., 3 50: Buffalo Westminster, 18 18. Cayuga-Aurora, 11 92. Genesee- Bergen, 12 14. Geneva- Naples, 3 45; Ovid, 5 76. Hudson-Middletown 2d, 2 59; Monroe 1st, 6 44. Long Island-Cutchogue, 7. Nassau-St. Paul's Ger., 4. Rochester-Brockport, 22 70. St. Lawrence-Carthage, 9. Steuben-Arkport, 56 cts. Utica-Oneida, 24 83; Waterville 1st, 8 50. 204 39

OHIO.-Bellefontaine-Spring Hills, 89 cts. CincinnatiCincinnati 2d, 30 10. Dayton-Oxford, 15 69. Maumee Weston, 4. Portsmouth-Russellville, 10. Steubenville-Cor

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