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So, when the faithful pencil has design'd
Some bright idea of the master's mind';
When a new world leaps out at his command',
And ready Nature waits upon his hand';
When the ripe colours soften and unite",
And sweetly melt into just shades and light;
When mellowing years their full perfection give
And each bold figure just begins to live';
The treacherous colours the fair art betray',
And all the bright creation, fades away`.

SERIES OF SERIESES.

Definition.-Two or more simple particulars, combined with two or more compound particulars, and all united in forming an independent member of a sentence, constitute what is termed a series of serieses.

GENERAL RULE.-When several compound members occur, composed of similar or opposite particulars, and forming a simple series, they may be divided according to their natures into couplets or triplets, and pronounced, singly according to the appropriate rule of the simple series; but altogether agreeably to the number of compound particulars in the whole period, and according to the appropriate rule of the compound series.

Example.-For I am persuaded, that neither life', nor death`; nor angels, nor principalities', nor powers; nor things present, nor things to come; nor height, nor depth; nor any other creature, shall be able to separate me from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord'.

THE DASH.

GENERAL RULE.-To those members of a sentence separated by the Dash, the same inflections must be applied, according to their nature, as would be applied were the parts set off by any other points.

Example. In general, the manners of Mr. Henry were those of the plain Virginian gentleman-kind-open- -candid-and conciliating warm without insincerity-and polite without pomp-neither chilling by his reserve-nor fatiguing by his loquacity—but adapting himself without effort to the character of his company`.

INTERROGATIVE SENTENCES.

RULE 1. Those interrogative sentences which are commenced with a verb, always adopt the ́inflection.

Examples. Is justice lame among us, my friend, as well As blind? Can he exalt his thoughts to any thing great and

noble, who believes that, after a short turn upon the stage of this world, he is to sink for ever into oblivion?

RULE 2. Those interrogative sentences that commence with a verb which is followed by the disjunctive conjunction or, adopts, at the close of the first part, the inflection, and at the end of the second, the inflection.

Examples.-Shall we, in your person, crown the author of the public calamity, or shall we destroy him? Will the trials of this life continue for ever, or will time finally dissipate them?

RULE S.-Those interrogative sentences that commence with the interrogative pronoun or adverb, always close with the inflection.

Examples-Who will take the trouble of answering these questions? How will he collect the necessary evidence? Whence derive his authorities`? When adjust all the contending points?

RULE 4.-When the interrogative sentence consists of several members following in succession, commencing with a pronoun or adverb, all those members adopt the inflection, save the penultimate, which takes the 'inflection.

Example. Where can he find such cogent exhortations to the practice of virtue`; such strong excitements to piety and holiness; and, at the same time, such assistance in attaining them', as are contained in the Holy Bible?

RULE 5.-When the interrogative sentence commences with a verb, and consists of several succeeding members, they all adopt the inflection.

Example.-Would an infinitely wise being make such a glorious creature as man, for so mean a purpose? can he delight in the production of such abortive intelligences', such short lived rational beings? would he give him talents that are not to be exerted', and capacities that are not to be gratified'?

RULE 6.-When the interrogative sentence presents a combination of particulars, forming a series of serieses, they adopt, according to their natures, both the and the inflections. The last member, however, upon which the question turns, must always have the inflection.

Example.-Do you imagine the hours wasted in idle prate the days devoted to vain amusements, the weeks lavished on dress and parade, and the months squandered without end or aim, are all lost in the great account of eternity? or will they, like an army of departed ghosts, rise to your affrighted memory, and condemn you

noble, who believes that, after a short turn upon the stage of this world, he is to sink for ever into oblivion?

RULE 2.-Those interrogative sentences that commence with a verb which is followed by the disjunctive conjunction or, adopts, at the close of the first part, the inflection, and at the end of the second, the inflection.

Examples.-Shall we, in your person, crown the author of the public calamity, or shall we destroy him? Will the trials of this life continue for ever, or will time finally dissipate them?

RULE 3.-Those interrogative sentences that commence with the interrogative pronoun or adverb, always close with the inflection.

Examples.-Who will take the trouble of answering these questions? How will he collect the necessary evidence? Whence derive his authorities`? When adjust all the contending points?

RULE 4.-When the interrogative sentence consists of several members following in succession, commencing with a pronoun or adverb, all those members adopt the inflection, save the penultimate, which takes the inflection.

Example. Where can he find such cogent exhortations to the practice of virtue'; such strong excitements to piety and holiness; and, at the same time, such assistance in attaining them', as are contained in the Holy Bible`?

RULE 5.-When the interrogative sentence commences with a verb, and consists of several succeeding members, they all adopt the inflection.

Example.-Would an infinitely wise being make such a glorious creature as man, for so mean a purpose? can he delight in the production of such abortive intelligences', such short lived rational beings? would he give him talents that are not to be exerted', and capacities that are not to be gratified'?

RULE 6.-When the interrogative sentence presents a combination of particulars, forming a series of serieses, they adopt, according to their natures, both the and the inflections. The last member, however, upon which the question turns, must always have the inflection.

Example.-Do you imagine the hours wasted in idle prate the days devoted to vain amusements, the weeks lavished on dress and parade, and the months squandered without end or aim', are all lost in the great account of eternity? or will they, like an army of departed ghosts, rise to your affrighted memory, and condemn you?

EXCLAMATION POINT,

GENERAL RULE.-Sentences and their members followed by this point, adopt, according to their natures, both inflections.

Example. If this is a man of pleasure, what is a man of pain? How quick`, how total, is his transit! In what a dismal gloom does he sit for ever! How short,alas'! is his day of rejoicing! for a moment he glitters', he dazzles! in a moment where is he? Oblivion covers his memory`!

PARENTHESIS.

RULE 1.-When this figure is used either with or without the comma, it always adopts the inflection.

Examples.-Natural historians observe', (for while I am in the country I must thence bring my allusions') that male birds only have voices.

Know ye not, brethren', (for I speak to them that know the law, that the law has dominion over a man so long as he lives?

I had letters from him, (here I felt in my pocket',) that exactly spoke the king's mind'.

RULE 2.-When the parenthesis is set off by the semico lon, colon, or dash, the inflection obtains.

Example. Then went the captain with the officers, and brought the apostles without violence'; (for they feared the people lest they should have been stoned';) and when they had brought them, they set them before the council.

RULE S.-That phrase or member which intervenes and breaks the connexion of a sentence, is, whether long or short, of the nature of a parenthesis, and is preceded and fo!lowed by the inflection.*

Examples. The minister's talents, formed for great enterprise', could not fail of rendering him conspicuous`.

I shall always remember, my friends', with the most lively gratitude, your continued kindness to me.

He is alternately supported', and has been for these ten years, by his father, his brother, and his uncle`.

EMPHASIS.

Definition.-Emphasis is that peculiar stress of the voice, with which the important words in a sentence are pronounced, in order to distinguish them from the less important or little connective particles.

RULE 1.-Those words and phrases in a sentence which stand opposed to each other, adopt the strong emphasis.

Examples. Many people mistake the love of virtue for the practice of it.

Many states were in alliance with, and under the protection of the then mistress of the world.

The wise man is happy when he gains his own esteem; the fool when he gains the esteem of others.

RULE 2.-That word or phrase in a sentence which suggests or dictates the opposing word, must take the strong emphasis.

Examples-When a Persian soldier was railing against Alexander the Great, his officer reproved him by saying, "Sir, you were paid to fight against Alexander."

Justice, my friend, appears to be lame among us.
And Nathan said unto David, Thou art the man.

EMPHATIC INFLECTIONS.

RULE 1.-When emphasis is positive and affirms something, it always dictates the inflection.

Examples. An honest man may, without blame, risk his property in equitable trade.

Sir, you were paid to fight against Alexander`.

I think you informed me that your brother supplied your

wants`.

In the perusal of a book, a man expects to be instructed. This treaty secures the honour of the United States`. RULE 2.-When emphasis denies something, it always adopts the 'inflection.

Examples.-An honest man may risk his property without blame, in equitable trade, but not in gambling.

Sir, you were paid to fight against Alexander, not to rail at him.

I think you informed me that your brother supplied your wants, and not your doting father.

In the perusal of a book, a man expects to be instructed`, not corrupted.

This treaty, says Fisher Ames, secures the honour of the United States, and therefore cannot compromise it.

Washington never fought for personal fame', but he fought for the freedom of his country`.

READING VERSE.

RULE 1.-That sentence, or member of a sentence, which, in prose, would, according to the foregoing rules, adopt the inflection, must adopt it also in poetry.

EXAMPLES.

But when old age has silver'd o'er thy head',
en memory fails', and all thy vigour's fled',
Then may'st thou seek the stillness of retreat',

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