Sense and Sensibility

Front Cover
Macmillan Company, 1901 - 341 pages
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Took a While

User Review  - maega - Overstock.com

I ordered Sense and Sensibility along with a waffle maker weird combo I know. The waffle maker arrived about a week before the book did. I gave 4 stars because it took so long for the book to arrive. Otherwise everything was great. Read full review

Contents

I
vii
II
1
III
6
IV
10
V
16
VI
20
VII
23
VIII
27
XXVII
137
XXVIII
144
XXIX
150
XXX
155
XXXI
165
XXXII
173
XXXIII
183
XXXIV
191

IX
31
X
34
XI
39
XII
45
XIII
49
XIV
54
XV
61
XVI
65
XVII
72
XVIII
79
XIX
83
XX
88
XXI
97
XXII
103
XXIII
112
XXIV
120
XXV
126
XXVI
132
XXXV
201
XXXVI
209
XXXVII
216
XXXVIII
223
XXXIX
237
XL
247
XLI
252
XLII
259
XLIII
267
XLIV
273
XLV
283
XLVI
299
XLVII
304
XLVIII
313
XLIX
320
L
324
LI
335

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 8 - it is better than parting with fifteen hundred pounds at once. But then, if Mrs. Dashwood should live fifteen years, we shall be completely taken in.
Page 82 - in a total misapprehension of character in some point or other : fancying people so much more gay or grave, or ingenious or stupid, than they really are, and I can hardly tell why, or in what the deception originated. Sometimes one is guided by what they say of themselves, and very frequently by what other people say of them, without giving one's self time to deliberate and judge." "But I thought it was right, Elinor," said Marianne, " to be guided wholly by the opinion of other people.
Page xiii - I had forgot her; but she may be 'prenticed out at small cost, and then what does it signify? Delaford is a nice place, I can tell you; exactly what I call a nice old-fashioned place, full of comforts and conveniences; quite shut in with great garden walls that are covered with the best fruit-trees in the country, and such a mulberry tree in one corner! Lord! How Charlotte and I did stuff the only time we were there!
Page 331 - ... to Elinor herself, who had heard so much of it from Colonel Brandon, and heard it with so much attention, as to be entirely mistress of the subject. One question after this only remained undecided between them ; one difficulty only was to be overcome. They were brought together by mutual affection, with the warmest approbation of their real friends ; their intimate knowledge of each other seemed to make their happiness certain, and they only wanted something to live upon. Edward had two thousand...
Page 40 - The same books, the same passages, were idolised by each ; or if any difference appeared, any objection arose, it lasted no longer than till the force of her arguments and the brightness of her eyes could be displayed. He acquiesced in all her decisions, caught all her enthusiasm ; and long before his visit concluded, they conversed with a familiarity of a longestablished acquaintance. " Well, Marianne," said Elinor, as soon as he had left them, " for one morning I think you have done pretty well.
Page 85 - I do not like crooked, twisted, blasted trees. I admire them much more if they are tall, straight, and flourishing. I do not like ruined, tattered cottages. 1 am not fond of nettles or thistles, or heath blossoms. I have more pleasure in a snug farm-house than a watch-tower, — and a troop of tidy, happy villagers please me better than the finest banditti in the world.
Page 82 - But I thought it was right, Elinor," said Marianne, " to be guided wholly by the opinion of other people. I thought our judgments were given us merely to be subservient to those of neighbours. This has always been your doctrine, I am sure.
Page 27 - On every formal visit a child ought to be of the party, by way of provision for discourse. In the present case it took up ten minutes to determine whether the boy were most like his father or mother, and in what particular he resembled either, for of course every body differed, and every body was astonished at the opinion of the others.
Page 201 - There was a kind of cold-hearted selfishness on both sides which mutually attracted them ; and they sympathized with each other in an insipid propriety of demeanour, and a general want of understanding. The same manners, however, which recommended Mrs. John Dashwood to the good opinion of Lady Middleton did not suit the fancy of Mrs. Jennings ; and to her she appeared nothing more than...
Page 77 - with what transporting sensations have I formerly seen them fall! How have I delighted, as I walked, to see them driven in showers about me by the wind ! What feelings have they, the season, the air altogether inspired I Now there is no one to regard them. They are seen only as a nuisance, swept hastily off, and driven as much as possible from the sight.

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