Inside Organized Racism: Women in the Hate Movement

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University of California Press, Jul 9, 2003 - Social Science - 272 pages
Following up her highly praised study of the women in the 1920s Ku Klux Klan, Blee discovers that many of today's racist women combine dangerous racist and anti-Semitic agendas with otherwise mainstream lives. The only national sample of a broad spectrum of racist activists and the only major work on women racists, this important book also sheds light on how gender relationships shape participation in the movement as a whole.
 

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Inside organized racism: women in the hate movement

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Sociologist Blee (Univ. of Pittsburgh; The Road to Poverty: The Making of Wealth and Hardship in Appalachia) interviewed 34 women members of neo-Nazi groups, the KKK, Christian Identity groups, or ... Read full review

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User Review  - ScoutJ - LibraryThing

More of a collection of bits than a coherent narrative. Very useful information, hard-won at that, but just not in quite as useful a format. Read full review

Contents

Crossing a Boundary
1
The Racist Self
25
Whiteness
54
Enemies
73
The Place of Women
111
A Culture of Violence
156
Lessons
187
Racist Groups
193
Methodology
198
Antiracist Organizations
205
Notes
207
Bibliography
247
Acknowledgments
267
Index
269
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About the author (2003)

Kathleen M. Blee is Professor of Sociology at the University of Pittsburgh. She is the author of Women of the Klan: Racism and Gender in the 1920s (California, 1991), editor of No Middle Ground: Women and Radical Protest (1998), coauthor of The Road to Poverty: The Making of Wealth and Hardship in Appalachia (2000), and coeditor of Feminism and Antiracism: International Struggles for Justice (2001).

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