Śaivism in Philosophical Perspective: A Study of the Formative Concepts, Problems, and Methods of Śaiva Siddhānta

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Motilal Banarsidass Publ., 1973 - Hindu philosophy - 687 pages
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Saivism is one of the pervasive expressions of Indian Religious Culture stretching to the dim past of pre-history and surviving as a living force in the thought and life of millions of Hindus especially in Southern India and Northern Ceylon. The present work is scholarly reconstruction of Saivism in its characteristic and classical from as Saiva Siddhanta, focusing mainly on the philosophical doctrine and presenting a conceptual analysis of its formative notions, problems and methods. Anteceding the rise of the great systems of Vedanta including that of Sankara, Saiva Siddhanta in its fully systematised form as Mystical Theology in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries represents a constructive reaction to the theological, ethical and aesthetic aspects of Vedanta as a whole. A patient study of this much neglected phase of religo-philosophical development of India should prove useful for a more balanced understanding of Indian religiosity, providing a corrective to the view entertained not without justification that Indian religious thought does not affirms the values of freedom, love and personality. This methodical study, appended with very exhaustive glossary, bibliography and index and two-hundred pages of references and foot-notes is designed to meet the requirements of seriious students of Eastern religious thought.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
The Existence of
43
God as Cause
69
God as the only Cause
100
God as the Lord of Cosmic Functions
127
God as the Moral Sovereign
153
God as Will and Being
177
the theogonic process
187
Selfvalidity of Knowledge and Revelation
336
Examination of Extrinsic Apprehension of Validity
350
Some Objections Considered
356
Spiritual Life as Means Sadhana
371
Spiritual Life as End Moksa
405
Transcendent Enjoyment
412
NOTES AND REFERENCES
421
God and the Absolute 189
481

Interpretation of Maya
205
Doctrine of Thirtysix Tattvas
220
The Doctrine of Ma
265
The Self and its Knowledge
279
Valid and Nonvalid Knowledge
307
GLOSSARY OF TECHNICAL TERMS
621
BIBLIOGRAPHY
646
INDEX
657
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Page 17 - Memory requires more than mere dating of a fact in the past. It must be dated in my past. In other words, I must think that I directly experienced its occurrence. It must have that 'warmth and intimacy...
Page 15 - ... rigid, motionless, and totally lacking in initiative or influence, cannot call forth our worship. Like the Taj Mahal, which is unconscious of the admiration it arouses, the Absolute remains indifferent to the fear and love of its worshippers, and for all those who regard the goal of religion as the goal of philosophy — to know God is to know the real — Sarhkara's view seems to be a finished example of learned error.

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