Sense and Sensibility, Volume 2

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Little, Brown, 1892 - English fiction
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this is not helping me at all with a summary about the book!!! ;(

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Page 290 - The whole of Lucy's behaviour in the affair, and the prosperity which crowned it, therefore, may be held forth as a most encouraging instance of what an earnest, an unceasing attention to self-interest, however its progress may be apparently obstructed, will do in securing every advantage of fortune, with no other sacrifice than that of time and conscience.
Page 295 - His wife was not always out of humour, nor his home always uncomfortable; and in his breed of horses and dogs, and in sporting of every kind, he found no inconsiderable degree of domestic felicity.
Page 87 - John Dashwood had not much to say for himself that was worth hearing, and his wife had still less. But there was no peculiar disgrace in this, for it was very much the case with the chief of their visitors, who almost all laboured under one or other of these disqualifications for being agreeable - want of sense, either natural or improved, want of elegance, want of spirits, or want of temper.
Page 137 - She felt all the force of that comparison; but not as her sister had hoped, to urge her to exertion now; she felt it with all the pain of continual self-reproach, regretted most bitterly that she had never exerted herself before; but it brought only the torture of penitence, without the hope of amendment. Her mind was so much weakened that she still fancied present exertion impossible, and therefore it only dispirited her more.
Page 294 - Marianne Dashwood was born to an extraordinary fate. She was born to discover the falsehood of her own opinions, and to counteract by her conduct her most favorite maxims. She was born to overcome an affection formed so late in life as at seventeen, and with no sentiment superior to strong esteem and lively friendship, voluntarily to give her hand to another!
Page 79 - I ever saw, — and as likely to attract the men. There was something in her style of beauty to please them particularly. I remember Fanny used to say, that she would marry sooner and better than you did; not but what she is exceedingly fond of you, but so it happened to strike her. She will be mistaken, however. I question whether Marianne, now, will marry a man worth more than five or six hundred a year at the utmost, and I am very much deceived if you do not do better.
Page 43 - Marianne moved to the window. " It is Colonel Brandon ! " said she, with vexation. " We are never safe from him." " He will not come in, as Mrs. Jennings is from home." " I will not trust to that," retreating to her own room. " A man who has nothing to do with his own time has no conscience in his intrusion on that of others.
Page 294 - Instead of falling a sacrifice to an irresistible passion, as once she had fondly flattered herself with expecting, — instead of remaining even for ever with her mother, and finding her only pleasures in retirement and study, as afterwards in her more calm and sober judgment...
Page 33 - ... prenticed out at small cost, and then what does it signify? Delaford is a nice place, I can tell you; exactly what I call a nice old fashioned place, full of comforts and conveniences; quite shut in with great garden walls that are covered with the best fruittrees in the country: and such a mulberry tree in one corner! Lord! how Charlotte and I did stuff the only time we were there!
Page 151 - Ah! Colonel, I do not know what you and I shall do without the Miss Dashwoods;" - was Mrs. Jennings's address to him when he first called on her, after their leaving her was settled - "for they are quite resolved upon going home from the Palmers; - and how forlorn we shall be, when I come back! - Lord! we shall sit and gape at one another as dull as two cats/

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