Brain, Mind and the Signifying Body: An Ecosocial Semiotic Theory

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A&C Black, Jun 7, 2004 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 360 pages
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Thought always exaggerates' Hannah Arendt writes. The question of exaggeration becomes a philosophical question when thought endeavours to clarify the ways in which it relates to limits. If its disclosing force depends on exaggeration, so does the;confusion to which it can;fall prey. This book analyses concepts such as truth and trust, practices such as politics and art, experiences such as the formation of a life line and its erasure, from the viewpoint of exaggeration.
 

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Contents

Part II
57
Part III
169
Epilogue
314
References
318
Name Index
331
Subject Index
334
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Paul J. Thibault is Professor in Linguistics and Media Communication, Agder University College, Kristiansand, Norway. Professor M. A. K. Halliday (b. 1925) was Foundation Professor of Linguistics at the University of Sydney until his retirement and has taught as a Visiting Professor around the world. As a self-styled 'generalist' he has published in many branches of linguistics.

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