A History of England in the Lives of Englishmen, Volume 4

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A. Fullarton, 1853 - Great Britain
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Page 75 - An Act for the Amendment of the Law, and the better Advancement of Justice...
Page 399 - I now design to suppress. Philosophy is such an impertinently litigious lady, that a man had as good be engaged in lawsuits, as have to do with her.
Page 400 - I keep the subject constantly before me, and wait till the first dawnings open slowly by little and little into a full and clear light.
Page 181 - This should have been a noble creature: he Hath all the energy which would have made A goodly frame of glorious elements, Had they been wisely mingled; as it is, It is an awful chaos — light and darkness, And mind and dust, and passions and pure thoughts, Mix'd, and contending without end or order, All dormant or destructive.
Page 454 - I assured him that I did not at all take it ill of Mr. Tickell that he was going to publish his translation; that he certainly had as much right to translate any author as myself; and that publishing both was entering on a fair stage. I then added, that I would not desire him to look over my first book of the Iliad, because he had looked over Mr.
Page 210 - But if a woman have long hair, it is a glory to her, for her hair is given her for a covering. 16 But if any man seem to be contentious, we have no such custom, neither the churches of God...
Page 275 - The difficulties and discouragements which attend the Study of the Scriptures, in the way of private judgment...
Page 53 - If the plaintiff has a right, he must of necessity have a means to vindicate and maintain it, and a remedy if he is injured in the exercise or enjoyment of it; and indeed it is a vain thing to imagine a right without a remedy; for want of right and want of remedy are reciprocal.
Page 254 - The Rights, Powers, and Privileges, of an English Convocation, stated and vindicated, in answer to a late book of Dr Wake's, intituled, ' The Authority of Christian Princes,
Page 223 - Some Passages of the Life and Death of John, Earl of Rochester," which the critic ought to read for its elegance, the philosopher for its arguments, and the saint for its piety.

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